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Posts Tagged ‘odor’

FDA Alert – Recall: Tylenol Extra Strength Caplets, 225 count bottles – Uncharacteristic Odor

Posted by 4love2love on July 24, 2011

June 29, 2011

ISSUE
: McNeil Consumer Healthcare is recalling one product lot of Tylenol Extra Strength Caplets, 225 count bottles, distributed in the U.S. The recall stems from a small number of odor reports, including musty, moldy odor. The uncharacteristic musty, moldy odor has been linked to the presence of trace amounts of a chemical known as 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA). While not considered to be toxic, TBA can generate an offensive odor and has been associated with temporary and non-serious gastrointestinal symptoms.

BACKGROUND: The Tylenol lot ABA619 – which includes 60,912 bottles – was manufactured in February, 2009. The product lot number for the recalled product can be found on the side of the bottle label.

RECOMMENDATION: Consumers who purchased product from the lot included in this recall should stop using the product and contact McNeil Consumer Healthcare, either at http://www.tylenol.com or by calling 1-888-222-6036 (Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time) for instructions about receiving a refund or product coupon. Consumers who have medical concerns or questions should contact their healthcare provider.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report.htm
  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

Posted in Health & Wellness Information | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on FDA Alert – Recall: Tylenol Extra Strength Caplets, 225 count bottles – Uncharacteristic Odor

Huffington Post – What Is ‘Smelly Hair Syndrome?’

Posted by 4love2love on July 6, 2011

Perry Romanowski

Cosmetic chemist, co-creator of BeautyBrains.com

Posted: 07/5/11 08:12 AM ET

Everyone has an occasional “bad hair day,” but for those unfortunate people stricken with a condition known as “Smelly Hair Syndrome,” a bad hair day can mean relationship problems, taunts from coworkers and even expulsion from school. Consider these examples:

“I wash my hair and by the middle of the day it has a sweaty, muggy smell … I’m a sophomore in college, never had a boyfriend, never even kissed a guy, all because of this smelly demon that I have had to cope with since eighth grade.” — Corrin, The Beauty Brains Forum

“I go to work everyday because I have no choice, but my co-workers are very cruel to me because of the bad odor they smell coming from my head. They don’t know how hard I try to take care of this problem.” — Sierra, The Beauty Brains Forum

“An 8-year-old girl said she was removed from her classroom at a Seattle school because of the way her hair smelled. She has now missed a full week at Thurgood Marshall Elementary.” — KIRO TV report

What’s going on here? What is “Smelly Hair Syndrome” and can it really be so socially stigmatizing? After receiving hundreds of questions about this issue we were intrigued to find out more.

The symptoms of smelly hair
We discovered that Smelly Hair Syndrome manifests in one striking symptom: a horrific odor that emanates from the hair and scalp. According to the people who have commented on our blog, the olfactory character of the smell varies from person to person. Some describe it as “… stinks like a diaper.” Others have compared the smell to “sour milk, wet dog, moldy hay, potatoes, an old shoe or dirty socks, a jacket that’s never been to the dry cleaner, and an oily smell mixed with vomit.” The most unusual description we’ve heard was “… sort of a cross between Dorito’s Bold BBQ chips and cinnamon (and not a sweet smell, actually kinda foul) and maybe a hint of cheese.” And, finally, one unfortunate reader told us that “my hair is so smelly that sometimes flies buzz around my head.”

The odor is so strong that other people can easily notice it (“I know my co-workers could smell it and I was so embarrassed.”) Spouses and significant others have also told us that the odor is problematic because it can transfer to towels and pillow cases. For some people the smell is noticeable right after showering; for others it starts a few days after they’ve washed their hair. We received several comments from people who shower before sleep and wake up with a smelly scalp. Interestingly, one person pointed out that their hair starts out with one scent right after washing and changes to a different odor about 12 hours later. In addition to the malodor, some people experience increase in oily hair and scalp. One woman notices a “thick, oily, flour-like substance on my scalp.”

Causes and cures
These secondary symptoms made us wonder if a potential cause of Smelly Hair Syndrome could be seborrheic dermatitis (seb-o-REE-ik der-muh-TI-tis), because it causes an increase in oil production and flaky scalp residue. However, according to Mayo Clinic’s webpage, scalp odors like those described above are not typically associated with seborrheic dermatitis. Furthermore, our readers tell us that in many cases their doctors have not been able to identify a definitive cause. Many said that their doctors didn’t take the problem seriously: “I even went to the dermatologist. Twice! He never heard of such a thing and seemed to not even believe me which made me very angry! Why don’t these doctors have a clue?!” “I went to see a dermatologist. Which was of no help! I got prescriptions and so forth but nothing worked.”

Without a satisfactory medical explanation, people are left to figure out their own cures. Our readers have tried just about everything you can think of, including medicated shampoos like Nizoral, Selsun Blue, Neutrogena T/Gel, Head & Shoulders and Denorex. They’ve used tea tree-based products (like Giovanni Tea Tree Triple Treat conditioner) because of the alleged anti-fungal properties of tea tree oil (unfortunately, most tea tree oil shampoos contain very little of the actual oil). In desperation, some people have even tried medicated pet shampoos.

Others have forsaken commercial products for home remedies like lemon juice, baking soda, apple cider vinegar, coconut oil, aloe vera, neem oil, chlorophyll supplements and a mixture of honey and cinnamon. One person even uses hand sanitizer on her scalp two or three times a day. Then there’s the most elaborate of all the treatments we’ve heard of: “I go to this salon where they rub a liquid into your hair, wrap it in plastic wrap and steam it. This is followed with something they call ‘frequency treatment’ — it is a glass rod attached to a machine and they deliver something like an electrical impulse.”

What really works to treat Smelly Hair Syndrome? Of all the solutions proposed by our readers, two seemed to provide reasonably consistent results: Dial antibacterial liquid body wash and sulfur-containing soaps. These treatments make sense from a scientific point of view, if the cause is bacterial or fungal. An antibacterial agent (like the Triclosan used in the Dial bodywash) could prevent bacteria from growing, while sulfur could reduce scalp oiliness thereby eliminating the “food” that bacteria or fungi need to grow. For those who haven’t had success with other treatments, these two options maybe worth a try. Of course, you should consult with a dermatologist to ensure your symptoms aren’t caused by psoriasis or some other condition.

Conclusion
From the comments we’ve received, Smelly Hair Syndrome appears to be a real problem that is unresolved for many people. Based on our readers’ input, the medical community has not yet provided a satisfactory solution. According to our understanding of chemistry and hair and scalp biology, shampooing with sulfur and Triclosan-based soaps may offer some relief. We hope that more definitive treatment options are identified by the medical and cosmetic science communities.

 

© 2011 TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc.

Posted in Health & Wellness Information | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Huffington Post – What Is ‘Smelly Hair Syndrome?’

Kansas City Star – Spectacle that was Casey Anthony trial comes to a surprising end

Posted by 4love2love on July 6, 2011

By KYLE HIGHTOWER

The Associated Press


Defense attorney José Baez and Casey Anthony hugged Tuesday after the jury acquitted Anthony of murdering her daughter, Caylee.  Go to Kansas City.com for a photo  gallery.
Red Huber
Defense attorney José Baez and Casey Anthony hugged Tuesday after the jury acquitted Anthony of murdering her daughter, Caylee. Go to Kansas City.com for a photo gallery.

ORLANDO, Fla. | Casey Anthony’s eyes welled with tears and her lips trembled as the verdict was read once, twice and then a third time: “Not guilty” of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee.

Outside the courthouse, many in the crowd of 500 reacted with anger, chanting, “Justice for Caylee!” One man yelled, “Baby killer!”

In one of the most divisive verdicts since O.J. Simpson was acquitted in 1995 of murdering his ex-wife, Anthony was cleared Tuesday of murder, manslaughter and child-abuse charges after weeks of wall-to-wall TV coverage and armchair-lawyer punditry.

Anthony, 25, was convicted only of four misdemeanor counts of lying to investigators who were looking into the child’s June 2008 disappearance.

Anthony could get up to a year behind bars on each count when she is sentenced Thursday. But since she has been in jail for nearly three years already, she could walk free. Had she been convicted of murder, she could have gotten the death penalty.

After a trial of a month and a half, the Florida 9th Judicial Circuit Court jury took less than 11 hours to reach a verdict in a case that had become a national cable TV sensation.

Prosecutors contended that Anthony — a single mother living with her parents — suffocated Caylee with duct tape because she wanted to be free to hit the nightclubs and spend time with her boyfriend.

Defense attorneys argued that the little girl accidentally drowned in the family swimming pool, and that Anthony panicked and concealed the death because of the traumatic effects of sexual abuse by her father.

State’s Attorney Lawson Lamar said: “We’re disappointed in the verdict today because we know the facts and we’ve put in absolutely every piece of evidence that existed.”

The prosecutor lamented the lack of hard evidence, saying, “This is a dry-bones case. Very, very difficult to prove. The delay in recovering little Caylee’s remains worked to our considerable disadvantage.”

Anthony failed to report Caylee’s disappearance for a month. The child’s decomposed body was eventually found in the woods near her grandparents’ home six months after she was last seen. A medical examiner was never able to establish how she died, and prosecutors had only circumstantial evidence that Caylee had been killed.

“While we’re happy for Casey, there are no winners in this case,” Anthony attorney José Baez said after the verdict. “Caylee has passed on far, far too soon, and what my driving force has been for the last three years has been always to make sure that there has been justice for Caylee and Casey because Casey did not murder Caylee. It’s that simple. And today our system of justice has not dishonored her memory by a false conviction.”

Given the relative speed with which the jury came back, many court-watchers were expecting Anthony to be convicted and were stunned by the outcome.

Because the case got so much media attention in Orlando, jurors were brought in from the Tampa Bay area and sequestered for the entire trial, during which they listened to more than 33 days of testimony and looked at 400 pieces of evidence. Anthony did not take the stand.

The case became a macabre tourist attraction. People camped outside for seats in the courtroom, and scuffles broke out among those desperate to watch the drama unfold.

In closing arguments, prosecutor Linda Drane Burdick showed the jury two side-by-side images. One showed Anthony smiling and partying in a nightclub during the first month Caylee was missing. The other was the tattoo Anthony got a day before law enforcement learned of the child’s disappearance: the Italian words for “beautiful life.”

“At the end of this case, all you have to ask yourself is whose life was better without Caylee?” Burdick asked. “This is your answer.”

Prosecutors also focused heavily on an odor in the trunk of Anthony’s car, which forensics experts said was consistent with the smell of human decay. But the defense argued that the air analysis could not be duplicated, and that maggots in the trunk had come from a bag of trash.

Prosecutors hammered away at the lies Anthony told when the child was missing: She told her parents that she couldn’t produce Caylee because the girl was with a nanny named Zanny — a woman who doesn’t exist; that she and her daughter were spending time with a rich boyfriend who doesn’t exist; and that Zanny had been hospitalized after an out-of-town traffic crash and that they were spending time with her.

Baez contended that the toddler drowned and that when Anthony panicked, her father, a former police officer, decided to make the death look like a murder by putting duct tape on the girl’s mouth and dumping the body in the woods a quarter-mile away. Anthony’s father denied both the cover-up and abuse claims.

The verdict could divide people for years to come, just as the Simpson case did, with some believing Anthony got away with murder.

Posted on Tue, Jul. 05, 2011 11:23 PM

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/07/05/2996565/legal-spectacle-comes-to-surprising.html#ixzz1RMlJFz00

Copyright 2011 Kansas City Star/Associated Press

 

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