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Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

Low-Carb Snacks – Buffalo chicken bites

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 25 minutes (includes baking time)

Buffalo chicken bites
Cooking spray
1 pound cooked chicken breasts, cut into bite-size chunks
1/2 cup red hot sauce (such as Frank’s Red Hot Sauce)
3 tablespoons melted, reduced-calorie margarine
2 teaspoons dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
Celery sticks
Reduced-fat ranch or blue cheese salad dressing (I prefer no salad dressing or an oil-based dressing)Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat a baking dish with cooking spray, and place chicken bites in the baking dish. In a bowl, combine Red Hot sauce, margarine, parsley, and garlic powder. Pour evenly over chicken. (If you wish, you can refrigerate the combined chicken and sauce until you are ready to heat and serve.) Bake for 20 minutes. Put a toothpick in each piece of chicken and place on serving tray. Serve with celery sticks and salad dressing.

Yield: 42 pieces
Serving size: 7 pieces

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 154
Carbohydrate: 1 g
Protein: 24 g
Fat: 6 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 209 mg
Fiber: <1 g

Exchanges per serving: 3 lean meat
Carbohydrate choices: 0


This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky.
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The Dreaded Weight Plateau: Tips to Get Over It

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

June 20, 2011

Amy Campbell

Last week we examined the typical reasons for those dreaded but all too real weight-loss plateaus (when you stop losing weight despite eating right and exercising regularly). They’re frustrating and discouraging, but they’re common (so at least you’re not alone!).

Luckily, if you’re in the midst of a plateau or if you ever have been stuck in one, chin up. There ARE things you can do to break that barrier and reach your weight goal. However, a word of caution: There’s no magic bullet for busting those plateaus, just as there’s no magic bullet for losing weight. You may need to try different approaches until you find what works…for you!

Nine Tips for Taking on (and Tripping up) the Plateau

1. Blast up your BMR… with food. Remember that BMR (basal metabolic rate) that we discussed last week? This is the rate at which your body burns calories to perform basic functions like breathing. You need to do everything in your power to give it a boost because it’s very likely turned a little sluggish at this point. A slowdown in your BMR happens because you’ve lost weight, particularly muscle weight. Here’s one way to jump-start it: make sure you’re eating enough (yes, that’s right!). If you’ve whittled your calorie intake down too much (less than 1600 calories for men, less than 1200 calories for women), you’ve probably gone too far. Your body has entered starvation mode, which means that it’s slowed everything down in an effort to preserve and conserve. Break the cycle and rev up your engines to get back on the calorie-burning bandwagon by eating more. If you need help, meet with a dietitian.

2. Dig out your pen and paper. Remember those days when your dietitian asked you to keep food records? If you’ve blocked that out of your memory, think about revisiting record keeping. Food record keeping can seem like a painful chore, but this process really does serve a purpose: By writing down everything that you eat and drink (and you need to be honest about it), you really can get a good picture of where things may have gone awry. Because let’s face it, sometimes weight loss slows down due to those sneaky little calories that seem to pile up when you’re not looking. Or, it may be that you let your emotions get the best of you and you deal with them by eating. You can uncover these things by keeping records, even for just a few days each week. (By the way, successful “losers” who are part of the National Weight Control Registry use record keeping as one of their tools for keeping the weight off.).

3. Figure out your food. By this, I mean, take a good hard look at what you’ve been eating. Food records will help you do this. Even if you refuse to keep records, it pays to focus on your food choices. Have you become too lenient with what you’re eating? In other words, are fatty or empty-calorie foods making their way back into your eating plan? They’re sneaky like that. What about your portions? When was the last time you actually weighed and measured your food? Are you SURE you’re only eating one cup of pasta? Dust off your meal plan or, if you don’t have one, get thyself to a dietitian, or consider joining a commercial weight-management program (such as Weight Watchers) or an online program to get back on the straight and narrow.

4. Ditch the dining out. You don’t have to forgo eating out altogether, but if you routinely eat lunch and dinner out, you’re pretty much guaranteed to consume far more calories than you realize…or need. Treat yourself to a meal out once a week and keep it at that.

5. Add resistance. In addition to scrutinizing your food intake, you have to take a hard look at your activity. Hitting the gym or walking is great, but your body needs to be pushed beyond its comfort zone. This doesn’t mean becoming a marathon runner, but if you’re doing the same old exercise routine day in and day out, you need to kick it up a notch. Particularly, you need to add strength training to your routine. This means using weights or resistance bands, or even using your own body weight as resistance. Remember that muscle burns calories, so you need to focus on building up your muscle mass.

6. Just do it…in intervals, that is. Interval training means changing up the intensity of your workout, not necessarily adding more time to your workout. To learn more about how to do this, speak with an exercise physiologist or a trainer at your local gym or Y. Read more about it here.

7. Drink water. There is some evidence that drinking water, especially cold water, can speed up your metabolism. And some people find that drinking water helps them curb their appetite.

8. De-stress. Some experts believe that constant stress affects metabolism by triggering the release of cortisol, a hormone that can lead to weight gain, among other things. Stress can also affect your food choices and interfere with being active. Deal with stress head-on by taking up yoga, practicing meditation or relaxation, or, if you need help, meeting with a mental health specialist.

9. Take a break. A prominent physician in the field of weight loss with whom I used to work always told his patients: “You first need to stop gaining weight before you can lose weight.” He also believed that it’s OK to maintain for a while. In other words, take a break, if you need it. Recharge and remotivate.

 

Re-posted from Amy Cambell’s blog

 

Copyright © 2011 R.A. Rapaport Publishing, Inc.

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Artichoke heart and salmon salad

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 25 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes (to blanch artichoke hearts)

4 fresh artichoke hearts, blanched and chopped (canned can be substituted)
Lemon half
1 can (12 ounces) water-packed, skinless, boneless salmon, drained well
1/2 cup frozen green peas, thawed and drained
2 celery ribs, chopped
1 tablespoon chopped celery leaves
4–6 green onions, chopped
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/4 cup reduced-calorie red wine vinaigrette salad dressing
4 radicchio leaves

To prepare the artichokes, trim stem and remove the thorny tops of the outer leaves with scissors or by bending the leaves. Cut off the top inch of the thin, inner leaves with a knife. Pull out the pink inner leaves by hand and remove the choke (bristle-like hairs) with a small scoop or knife. As you work, rub all cut surfaces with lemon to keep from browning. Submerge artichokes in water with some lemon juice added until ready to cook.

 

Bring 1 1/2 quarts of water to a boil in a saucepan, add artichokes, and cook for about 3–5 minutes until softened; let cool. When cooled, remove remaining leaves from hearts and cut hearts into quarters or chop coarsely.

In a medium bowl, combine salmon, artichoke hearts, peas, celery, celery leaves, green onions, lemon peel, and dressing. On each serving plate, place one leaf of radicchio. Scoop a quarter of the salad onto the leaf and serve.

Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: about 1 1/4

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 204
Carbohydrate: 13 g
Protein: 20 g
Fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 49 mg
Sodium: 745 mg
Fiber: 5 g

Exchanges per serving: 3 lean meat, 1 starch
Carbohydrate choices: 1


This recipe was developed by Kathleen Stanley, the Diabetes Education Program Coordinator at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. She frequently performs cooking demonstrations and has been involved in diabetes education for over 18 years.

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Skillet chicken piccata

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 5 minutes 

Cooking time: 20 minutes

4 four-ounce boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 cup plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
Nonstick cooking spray
Black pepper
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon light margarine
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1 cup fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup thawed and drained frozen green peas
1/4 cup chopped green onion

Using a meat mallet, pound chicken breasts to uniform thickness. Spread 1 cup flour on a dinner plate or shallow dish and dredge chicken pieces in flour. Spray a large skillet with nonstick cooking spray and heat to medium-high. Brown floured chicken pieces on both sides (about 2–3 minutes per side), then remove from skillet to a clean plate. Sprinkle chicken with black pepper. Lower heat under skillet to medium, and add olive oil, margarine, and garlic to skillet. When margarine has melted, sprinkle 1 tablespoon flour over mixture and stir into a roux (pastelike mixture). Slowly add chicken broth to skillet, stirring constantly with a whisk or spoon. Continue stirring until sauce thickens, then mix in lemon juice. Return chicken to skillet, spooning some of the sauce over the chicken. Cover skillet and cook an additional 7–10 minutes over medium heat until sauce bubbles and chicken is cooked through. Add peas and green onion to pan and cook 2 minutes more, then serve.

Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 breast

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 191
Carbohydrate: 3 g
Protein: 29 g
Fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 78 g
Sodium: 692 mg
Fiber: 1 g

Exchanges per serving: 4 lean meat
Carbohydrate choices: 0


This recipe was developed by Kathleen Stanley, a Diabetes Educator at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Chicken gumbo

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 45–55 minutes

Cooking spray
3/4 pound fresh okra or frozen, thawed okra, cut in 1/2-inch slices
1 tablespoon corn oil
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 can (14 1/2 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes, drained
1 medium onion, chopped
1 teaspoon (or 1 clove) minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each) 50%-reduced-sodium, fat-free chicken broth
1 cup water
1 pound cooked, diced, chicken breast (for convenience, thaw fully-cooked, frozen, diced chicken, such as Tyson)
3 2/3 cups cooked hot brown rice

Coat a nonstick skillet with cooking spray, warm over medium heat, add okra, and cook until slightly softened, about 6–8 minutes. Remove okra to a plate and set aside. Add oil to the skillet and warm over medium-high heat. Gradually add flour, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low and continue cooking and stirring until the flour-oil mixture turns golden brown, about 3–5 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high then stir in tomatoes, onion, garlic, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and salt. Cook until onion becomes translucent, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile combine broth and water in a stockpot, cover, and warm over medium heat. Stir tomato mixture into hot broth, mixing well. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low and stir in okra and chicken. Cover and simmer 30–40 minutes. Serve 1 cup gumbo over 1/3 cup cooked rice.

Yield: 11 servings
Serving size: 1 cup gumbo over 1/3 cup rice

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 163
Carbohydrate: 22 g
Protein: 12 g
Fat: 3 g
Saturated fat: <1 g
Cholesterol: 22 mg
Sodium: 391 mg
Fiber: 3 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 1 nonstarchy vegetable, 1 lean meat
Carbohydrate choices: 1 1/2


Tami Ross is a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Low-calorie lasagna roll-ups

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 40 minutes

6 rippled lasagna noodles
1 pound lean ground turkey, 7% fat
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 can (15 ounces) low-sodium crushed tomatoes
1/2 cup low-sodium canned tomato sauce
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
Nonstick cooking spray
1/2 cup shredded, part-skim mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley

Heat oven to 375°F. In a large pot, boil 4 quarts water over high heat, then add lasagna noodles, one at a time. Stir gently after adding last noodle, and boil 8–10 minutes. Noodles should be flexible but not overly soft. Drain noodles and immediately place on a baking sheet or cutting board in a single layer. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook ground turkey until cooked through, and break into crumbles. Add chopped onion and sauté until onions soften slightly. Add crushed tomatoes, tomato sauce, basil, oregano, garlic, black pepper, and red pepper flakes if desired. Stir and lower heat to simmer for 1–2 minutes. Spray a small baking dish (at least 9 inches square) with nonstick cooking spray. Handling each noodle separately, spoon about 1/4 cup of meat mixture along the length of the noodle, then roll up from one end. Place open-side down in the baking dish. Spoon remaining meat mixture evenly over the tops of the lasagna rolls. Sprinkle cheese evenly over the rolls, and bake 25 minutes or until cheese is lightly browned. Garnish with chopped parsley before serving.

Yield: 6 servings
Serving size: 1 roll

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 197
Carbohydrate: 29 g
Protein: 9 g
Fat: 5 g
Saturated fat: 3 g
Cholesterol: 43 mg
Sodium: 182 mg
Fiber: 3 g

Exchanges per serving: 2 starch, 1 medium-fat meat
Carbohydrate choices: 2


This recipe was developed by Kathleen Stanley, a Diabetes Educator at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Italian-style freezer sandwiches

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 45 minutes
Baking time: 55–60 minutes
Cooling time: 15 minutes

Italian-style freezer sandwiches
1 pound ground turkey breast
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely minced
1/4 cup diced black olives (approximately 1 ounce)
1 can (4 ounces) sliced mushrooms, drained
1 can (15 ounces) tomato sauce
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
12 hamburger buns
12 slices fat-free processed mozzarella cheeseIn a large nonstick skillet, brown and drain ground turkey. Add onion, jalapeño pepper, black olives, mushrooms, tomato sauce, garlic powder, oregano, and basil. Bring to a boil over high heat then reduce heat to medium and simmer uncovered for 10 minutes; stir frequently. Remove from heat and cool. (Meat filling may be served right away if desired; just increase cooking time from 10 minutes to 20 minutes).Spread bottom of each bun with 1/3 cup cooled meat filling. Top with 1 slice cheese and other half of bun. Wrap sandwiches tightly in foil. Place in freezer bags and freeze.

When ready to serve, preheat oven to 350°F and place the foil-wrapped sandwiches on a baking sheet. Bake for 55–60 minutes, or until heated through.

Yield: 12 sandwiches
Serving size: 1 sandwich

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 243
Carbohydrate: 29 g
Protein: 16 g
Fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 577 mg
Fiber: 1 g

Exchanges per serving: 2 starch, 1 1/2 lean meat, 1 fat
Carbohydrate choices: 1 1/2


This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Diabetes Self-Management – Lower-Carb Diet Reduces Dangerous Fat in Some

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

June 24, 2011

A slight reduction in carbohydrate intake may help decrease a person’s level of dangerous visceral fat, or deep abdominal fat, even if he has not lost any weight, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visceral fat, which surrounds abdominal organs, increases the risk of developing insulin resistance (a component of Type 2 diabetes), heart disease, and various other conditions.

Researchers recruited 69 overweight but healthy men and women. The participants were given food for two consecutive eight-week periods; the first period consisted of a weight-maintenance meal plan, and the second period consisted of a weight-loss meal plan that cut each person’s calories by 1,000 each day. The participants received either a standard lower-fat diet, comprised of 55% of calories from carbohydrate and 27% of calories from fat, or a slightly higher-fat diet that had a modest reduction in the carbohydrate content. This diet, which contained foods that were relatively low on the glycemic index (a ranking of carbohydrate-containing foods based on how quickly they raise blood glucose levels), was comprised of 43% of calories from carbohydrate and 39% of calories from fat. In both diets, the final 18% of calories came from protein. At the beginning and end of each phase of the study, the participants had their visceral fat and total body fat measured using different types of medical scans.

When they analyzed the results, the researchers found that during the weight-loss phase of the study, participants on both of the diets lost weight, but those on the lower-carbohydrate diet averaged a 4% greater loss of total body fat. Moreover, during the weight-maintenance phase, people on the lower-carbohydrate diet were found to have 11% less visceral fat than people on the standard diet. After analyzing these results by race, the researchers determined that this result was exclusive to whites, who generally have more deep abdominal fat than blacks (even when matched for body weight or percent body fat).

According to lead study author Barbara Gower, PhD, decreasing the amount of visceral fat “could help reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, stroke, and coronary artery disease. For individuals willing to go on a weight-loss diet, a modest reduction in carbohydrate-containing foods may help them preferentially lose fat, rather than lean tissue. The moderately reduced carbohydrate diet allows a variety of foods to meet personal preferences.”

For more information, see the press release “Cut Down On ‘Carbs’ to Reduce Body Fat, Study Authors Say” from The Endocrine Society.

 

Blog entry re-post from Diane Fennell

Copyright © 2011 R.A. Rapaport Publishing, Inc.

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Reuters – Heart risks lower in men who get enough vitamin D

Posted by 4love2love on June 24, 2011

Amy Norton Reuters3:22 p.m. EDT, June 24, 2011

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Men who consume the recommended amount of vitamin D are somewhat less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke than those who get little of the vitamin in their diets, a large U.S. study suggests.

Following nearly 119,000 adults for two decades, researchers found that men who got at least 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D each day — the current recommended amount — were 16 percent less likely to develop heart problems or a stroke, versus men who got less than 100 IU per day.

There was no such pattern among women, however, the researchers report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The authors say the findings do not prove that vitamin D, itself, deserves the credit for the lower risks seen in men. So they should not start downing supplements for the sake of their hearts.

“The evidence is not strong enough yet to make solid recommendations,” said lead researcher Dr. Qi Sun, a research associate at the Harvard School of Public Health.

On the other hand, the apparent benefits were linked to vitamin D intakes near what’s already recommended: Last year, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), a scientific advisory panel to the U.S. government, bumped up the recommended dose to 600 IU for most people. Adults older than 70 were told to get 800 IU.

So these latest findings may encourage more people to meet those guidelines, Sun said.

But as far as whether vitamin D cuts heart disease and stroke risk, the jury is still out.

Sun said that more answers should come from an ongoing clinical trial that is looking at whether a high dose of vitamin D (2,000 IU per day) can cut the risk of heart disease, stroke and other chronic diseases.

Clinical trials, wherein people are randomly assigned to a treatment or a placebo, are considered the “gold standard” of medical evidence.

So far, there have been few such randomized clinical trials testing vitamin D’s health effects.

A flurry of studies in recent years has linked higher vitamin D intake to lower risks of everything from diabetes, to severe asthma, heart disease, certain cancers and depression.

The problem with those studies is that were “observational” — researchers looked at people’s vitamin D intake, or their blood levels of the vitamin, and whether they developed a given health condition. Those kinds of studies cannot prove cause-and-effect.

The current study was also observational, based on data from two long-term projects that have followed two large groups of U.S. health professionals since the 1980s.

Out of 45,000 men, there were about 5,000 new cases of cardiovascular disease over the study period. These were defined by an incident of heart attack, stroke, or death attributed to cardiovascular disease.

After accounting for a range of factors — like age, weight, exercise levels and other diet habits, such as fat intake – Sun’s team found that men who got at least 600 IU of vitamin D from food and supplements had a 16 percent lower risk of heart attack and stroke compared to men who got less than 100 IU of vitamin D per day.

For women, though, there was no correlation between vitamin D intake and cardiovascular health.

It’s not clear why that is, Sun said. One possibility is that women may have less active vitamin D circulating in the blood; vitamin D is stored in fat, and women typically have a higher percentage of body fat than men do.

But more research is needed, Sun said, to know whether real biological differences underlie the current findings.

In theory, vitamin D could help ward off heart disease and stroke; lab research suggests that it may help maintain healthy blood vessel function and blood pressure levels, reduce inflammation in the blood vessels, and aid blood sugar control.

But until clinical trials help show whether vitamin D works, Sun advised people to stick with the tried-and-true ways of protecting their hearts: maintaining a healthy weight, getting regular exercise, eating a well-balanced diet and not smoking.

“There are many established ways to lower your cardiovascular disease risk,” Sun said. “People can focus on those measures.”

As for vitamin D, the sun is the major natural source, since sunlight triggers vitamin D synthesis in the body. Food sources are relatively few and include fatty fish like salmon and mackerel, and fortified dairy products and cereals.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/irO9Xe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, online June 8, 2011.

Copyright © 2011, Reuters

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Los Angeles Times – Research shows promise in reversing Type 1 diabetes

Posted by 4love2love on June 24, 2011

Experiments in a small number of people show that an inexpensive vaccine normally used against tuberculosis may stop the immune system from attacking pancreas cells. 

InsulinThe findings contradict an essential paradigm of diabetes therapy — that once the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas have been destroyed, they are gone forever. (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

 

By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles TimesJune 25, 2011

Preliminary experiments in a handful of people suggest that it might be possible to reverse Type 1 diabetes using an inexpensive vaccine to stop the immune system from attacking cells in the pancreas.

Research in mice had already shown that the tuberculosis vaccine called BCG, prevents T cells from destroying insulin-secreting cells, allowing the pancreas to regenerate and begin producing insulin again, curing the disease.

Now tests with very low doses of the vaccine in humans show transient increases in insulin production, researchers will report Sunday at a San Diego meeting of the American Diabetes Assn.
The Massachusetts General Hospital team is now gearing up to use higher doses of the vaccine in larger numbers of people in an effort to increase and prolong the response.

The findings contradict an essential paradigm of diabetes therapy — that once the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas have been destroyed, they are gone forever. Because of that belief, most research today focuses on using vaccines to prevent the cells’ destruction in the first place, or on using beta cell transplants to replace the destroyed cells.

The new findings, however, hint that even in patients with long-standing diabetes, the body retains the potential to restore pancreas function if clinicians can only block the parts of the immune system that are killing the beta cells.

The results are “fascinating and very promising,” said immunology expert Dr. Eva Mezey, director of the adult stem-cell unit at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. But Mezey noted that the results had been achieved in only a small number of patients and that they suggest the vaccinations would have to be repeated regularly.

The key player in the diabetes study is a protein of the immune system called tumor necrosis factor, or TNF. Studies by others have shown that if you increase levels of TNF in the blood, it will block other parts of the immune system that attack the body, especially the pancreas.

To raise TNF levels, Dr. Denise Faustman of Massachusetts General Hospital and her colleagues have been working with the BCG vaccine, known formally as Bacille Calmette-Guerin. BCG has been used for more than 80 years in relatively low doses to stimulate immunity against tuberculosis. More recently, it has been used in much higher doses to treat bladder cancer.

Faustman first reported her findings in mice in a 2001 paper in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, but scientists reviewing her findings for that journal were so skeptical that she was not allowed to refer to “regeneration” of the pancreas in the paper. Instead, she was told to say “restoration of insulin secretion by return of blood sugar to normal.”

In 2003, she published a report in the journal Science in which she was able to use the word “regeneration,” but that finding was met by an “explosion of skepticism,” she said. Nonetheless, by 2007, “six international labs had duplicated the mouse experiments,” she said. “We needed to move forward into humans.”

In the human trial, Faustman and her colleagues studied six patients who had been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes for an average of 15 years. They were randomly selected to receive either two doses of BCG spaced four weeks apart or a placebo.

Careful examination of those receiving the vaccine showed a decline of T cells that normally attack the pancreas. It also revealed a temporary but statistically significant elevation of an insulin precursor called C-peptide, an indication that new insulin production was occurring.

“If this is reproducible and correct, it could be a phenomenal finding,” said Dr. Robert R. Henry of UC San Diego, who chaired the scientific program at the meeting. It suggests that once the destructive immune response is controlled, the body has the capability to produce more insulin, he said.

One of the patients receiving a placebo also showed a similar elevation of C-peptide, but that patient coincidentally became infected by Epstein-Barr virus, which is known to induce production of TNF.

The concentrations of BCG that the team used were much lower than they would have liked, but were the highest the Food and Drug Administration would permit, Faustman said.

She said she is now negotiating with the agency to use higher levels, which should produce a more pronounced effect, and to enroll more people.

The research is funded by philanthropists, primarily the Iacocca Family Foundation.

thomas.maugh@latimes.com

Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

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Free Sweetner Sample

Posted by 4love2love on June 10, 2011

Zingvia is a new, zero calorie sweetener that is being launch this spring in Canada. To help get the word out they are giving away free samples of their product. It is Stevia sweetener, which is a great sugar alternative for diabetics. Go to the sample page and sign up for your free sample today!

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What Cooking Means To Me

Posted by 4love2love on June 8, 2011

I have a genetic issue that causes me to be prone to high cholesterol. Right now, I am on medication to help control that, but I have worked to modify my diet to help relieve some of the cholesterol that I intake. I also have Type 2 diabetes, which means that I have to watch starches, sugars and carbs. I also have to be careful of calories because I am overweight.

So for me, cooking is an experiment in keeping myself healthy and off as many medications as possible. Right now, my diabetes is diet controlled. So every day is a challenge to see how different foods and ingredients affect my sugar levels. I also have to consider the amount of cholesterol in my ingredients, because I would like to eventually not require the cholesterol medications. I’ve had great cholesterol until recently, but within the last few months, my cholesterol has steadily gotten worse. Now it’s time to work even harder to cook healthier, better food that will work on my overall health and help me lose weight at the same time.

I’m well over 80 lbs overweight, but my goal is to get back down to 200 for now, which will mean losing another 40lbs. It’s coming off slowly but it is coming off. 2 years ago I was in a wheelchair, and could not walk without assistance. I stopped taking most of my medication since a lot of them were painkillers and within 2 months I was able to walk again with a cane. I still need it sometimes and I still have to use the mobile carts in the stores when shopping most of the time, but I am doing much better than I had been.

I grew up cooking hamburger helper and whatnot because I was the only girl and the oldest child and my father did not cook at all except the occasional eggs for breakfast. Since then, I have learned to use wine and acid in my cooking to improve flavor and have gotten to where I use little to no oil in almost everything I cook. I have learned some techniques that serve me well in the kitchen and I get a great amount of praise for the things I do cook from friends and neighbors that have sat in my house and eaten what I’ve prepared.

Eventually I would like to go to some culinary school and learn much much more than what I know now, and eventually possibly write my own recipe books. I hope to make more items from scratch and use less shortcuts and be able to cook tasty, healthy food that will be good for anyone with any type of medical condition that puts them on dietary restrictions.

All my recipes can be modified rather easily, as I don’t cook with much salt, preferring herbs for flavor. I love spicy food, but I realize not everyone does and I know that sometimes people will need to cut back on some of the heat I add to many of my dishes. I love hot peppers, just not too hot, though I’m not afraid to try anything. I see things like frog legs and alligator at the market and I am always tempted to buy them because I want to experiment. I’ll take a recipe someone else has done and turn it around to suit me once I’ve experienced what they have created because I love to find new flavors, new combinations, new techniques.

Cooking isn’t just a passion for me, it’s a way to survive. It’s a way to make sure that I’m going to live another 30 or more years without having serious problems with my health.

I hope that, knowing that, you will appreciate the recipes I provide as I provide them for what they are, which is my learning and growing as a cook.

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