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Posts Tagged ‘anger’

Huffington Post – Casey Anthony Trial: Anger At The Courthouse

Posted by 4love2love on July 6, 2011

David Lohr

First Posted: 07/5/11 10:42 PM ET Updated: 07/6/11 12:45 PM ET

Orlando, Fla. — Inside the courtroom, there was jubilation today for Casey Anthony and her defense team. Not only did they manage to avoid a first-degree murder conviction, they also dodged the possibility of a death sentence. However, outside on the courthouse steps, there was a lot of outrage and frustration at the verdict.

“It is not justice. I cannot believe this. How did an injustice like this happen? It is terrible, terrible,” Scott Corfee of Orlando, who sat in court when the verdict was announced, told The Huffington Post.

Randall Weeks, a resident of Miami who drove to the courthouse to hear the verdict, agreed.

“This is the biggest outrage since the O.J. Simpson trial,” Weeks said. “How could they be so blind? Where is justice? Who will pay for her daughter’s death?”

Anthony, 25, was found not guilty of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee, today. She was also found not guilty of aggravated child abuse and aggravated manslaughter of a child. But she was convicted on charges of misleading law enforcement.

As news of the verdict spread, angered onlookers swarmed the front of the courthouse. The group began shouting in unison, “We want justice” and chanted, “Justice for Caylee.”

A dozen or so sheriff’s deputies emerged from inside the courthouse and forced the angry crowd back. Officers put up caution tape and stood guard, blocking the courthouse doors. For a brief time, the media was stuck between the protesters and the police, unable to move until the area was secure.

“I am a firm believer in karma. Maybe justice did not get her, but karma will,” Corfee said.

A much more peaceful gathering was being held concurrently on Suburban Drive in Orlando, where Caylee’s remains were found in December 2008. For the second day in a row, hundreds of people made their way into the woods to pay their respects.

“This is the only way I know how to grieve,” said a neighbor of the Anthonys who did not wish to be identified. “We’ll never see little Caylee again. Only the Anthonys know where she has been laid to rest. We have no grave to visit, so what else can we do but come here to pay our respects?”

Casey Anthony will be back in court Thursday for sentencing on four misdemeanor counts of lying to police. Each count carries a maximum sentence of one year in county jail. The judge has the option of sentencing Anthony consecutively or concurrently. Anthony will receive credit for time served in jail since her 2008 arrest, meaning she could walk free.

While Thursday’s outcome is yet to be seen, Weeks and others the Huffington Post spoke with said they will be back on Thursday morning to get their views across regarding Anthony’s sentencing.

“You bet your ass we’ll be back,” Weeks’ friend, Jay Henderson, said. “We’ll all be back to have our voices heard.” Several in the crowd cheered in agreement as he spoke.

 

Orange County Courthouse
Dozens gather on the court house steps to show their outrage and frustration at the verdict. (Photo: David Lohr)
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Kansas City Star – Spectacle that was Casey Anthony trial comes to a surprising end

Posted by 4love2love on July 6, 2011

By KYLE HIGHTOWER

The Associated Press


Defense attorney José Baez and Casey Anthony hugged Tuesday after the jury acquitted Anthony of murdering her daughter, Caylee.  Go to Kansas City.com for a photo  gallery.
Red Huber
Defense attorney José Baez and Casey Anthony hugged Tuesday after the jury acquitted Anthony of murdering her daughter, Caylee. Go to Kansas City.com for a photo gallery.

ORLANDO, Fla. | Casey Anthony’s eyes welled with tears and her lips trembled as the verdict was read once, twice and then a third time: “Not guilty” of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee.

Outside the courthouse, many in the crowd of 500 reacted with anger, chanting, “Justice for Caylee!” One man yelled, “Baby killer!”

In one of the most divisive verdicts since O.J. Simpson was acquitted in 1995 of murdering his ex-wife, Anthony was cleared Tuesday of murder, manslaughter and child-abuse charges after weeks of wall-to-wall TV coverage and armchair-lawyer punditry.

Anthony, 25, was convicted only of four misdemeanor counts of lying to investigators who were looking into the child’s June 2008 disappearance.

Anthony could get up to a year behind bars on each count when she is sentenced Thursday. But since she has been in jail for nearly three years already, she could walk free. Had she been convicted of murder, she could have gotten the death penalty.

After a trial of a month and a half, the Florida 9th Judicial Circuit Court jury took less than 11 hours to reach a verdict in a case that had become a national cable TV sensation.

Prosecutors contended that Anthony — a single mother living with her parents — suffocated Caylee with duct tape because she wanted to be free to hit the nightclubs and spend time with her boyfriend.

Defense attorneys argued that the little girl accidentally drowned in the family swimming pool, and that Anthony panicked and concealed the death because of the traumatic effects of sexual abuse by her father.

State’s Attorney Lawson Lamar said: “We’re disappointed in the verdict today because we know the facts and we’ve put in absolutely every piece of evidence that existed.”

The prosecutor lamented the lack of hard evidence, saying, “This is a dry-bones case. Very, very difficult to prove. The delay in recovering little Caylee’s remains worked to our considerable disadvantage.”

Anthony failed to report Caylee’s disappearance for a month. The child’s decomposed body was eventually found in the woods near her grandparents’ home six months after she was last seen. A medical examiner was never able to establish how she died, and prosecutors had only circumstantial evidence that Caylee had been killed.

“While we’re happy for Casey, there are no winners in this case,” Anthony attorney José Baez said after the verdict. “Caylee has passed on far, far too soon, and what my driving force has been for the last three years has been always to make sure that there has been justice for Caylee and Casey because Casey did not murder Caylee. It’s that simple. And today our system of justice has not dishonored her memory by a false conviction.”

Given the relative speed with which the jury came back, many court-watchers were expecting Anthony to be convicted and were stunned by the outcome.

Because the case got so much media attention in Orlando, jurors were brought in from the Tampa Bay area and sequestered for the entire trial, during which they listened to more than 33 days of testimony and looked at 400 pieces of evidence. Anthony did not take the stand.

The case became a macabre tourist attraction. People camped outside for seats in the courtroom, and scuffles broke out among those desperate to watch the drama unfold.

In closing arguments, prosecutor Linda Drane Burdick showed the jury two side-by-side images. One showed Anthony smiling and partying in a nightclub during the first month Caylee was missing. The other was the tattoo Anthony got a day before law enforcement learned of the child’s disappearance: the Italian words for “beautiful life.”

“At the end of this case, all you have to ask yourself is whose life was better without Caylee?” Burdick asked. “This is your answer.”

Prosecutors also focused heavily on an odor in the trunk of Anthony’s car, which forensics experts said was consistent with the smell of human decay. But the defense argued that the air analysis could not be duplicated, and that maggots in the trunk had come from a bag of trash.

Prosecutors hammered away at the lies Anthony told when the child was missing: She told her parents that she couldn’t produce Caylee because the girl was with a nanny named Zanny — a woman who doesn’t exist; that she and her daughter were spending time with a rich boyfriend who doesn’t exist; and that Zanny had been hospitalized after an out-of-town traffic crash and that they were spending time with her.

Baez contended that the toddler drowned and that when Anthony panicked, her father, a former police officer, decided to make the death look like a murder by putting duct tape on the girl’s mouth and dumping the body in the woods a quarter-mile away. Anthony’s father denied both the cover-up and abuse claims.

The verdict could divide people for years to come, just as the Simpson case did, with some believing Anthony got away with murder.

Posted on Tue, Jul. 05, 2011 11:23 PM

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/07/05/2996565/legal-spectacle-comes-to-surprising.html#ixzz1RMlJFz00

Copyright 2011 Kansas City Star/Associated Press

 

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WebMD – Why Some Smokers Have a Harder Time Quitting

Posted by 4love2love on June 25, 2011

Study Shows Variation in Brain May Give Some Smokers More Pleasure From Nicotine
By Denise Mann
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

smoker and double helix overlay

May 16, 2011 — Quitting smoking is never easy, but some smokers have an even harder time kicking the habit, and now new research suggests that they may derive more pleasure form nicotine.

The new study, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may also help foster the development of more effective quitting strategies for certain smokers.

Researchers used PET scans to capture images of the number of “mu-opioid receptors” in the brains of smokers. Smokers with greater numbers of these receptors seem to derive more pleasure from nicotine, and as a result may have a harder time quitting.

“The brain’s opioid system plays a role in smoking rewards, and quitting smoking and some of the variability in our ability to quit among smokers is attributable to genetic factors,” says study researcher Caryn Lerman, PhD, director of Tobacco Use Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

“The ability to quit smoking is influenced by a number of psychological, social, and environmental factors, but also genetic factors,” she says. “For some people, genetic variations may make it more difficult to quit than for someone else who smokes the same amount for same amount of time,” Lerman says.

The study findings are more applicable to quitting smoking than becoming addicted in the first place, she says.

New Quitting Strategies/Tools Needed

There may be a role for personalized medicine when it comes to smoking cessation, Lerman says.  Personalized medicine takes the trial and error out of matching treatments by making decisions based on genetic profiles.

“Based on a person’s genetic background, we can select the optimal treatment,” she says. “It is a two-pronged approach of developing new medications and being able to make the best choice for a particular person based on existing options.”

Importantly, even diehard smokers should not take these findings to mean they can’t quit, she says.

“Don’t become fatalistic,” she says. “You may need particular approaches tailored to you,” she says. Going forward, “we hope to study this pathway in more detail to understand whether examining genetic background and the numbers of brain receptors can help us choose the right treatments for the right individual.”

Raymond S. Niaura, PhD, an associate director for science at the Schroeder Institute of the American Legacy Foundation, an antismoking group based in Washington, D.C., says that “there are genetic influences involved in becoming addicted to nicotine and tobacco and on how hard it is to quit smoking.”

The new findings provide “a peek into the genetic and underlying brain processes responsible for nicotine addiction,” he says.

Daniel Seidman, PhD, assistant clinical professor of medical psychology and the director of Smoking Cessation Services at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, agrees.“There are a lot of smokers and everybody gets lumped together, but there are a lot of patterns like with other types of addiction.”

This paper “points to a biological or genetic substrate which predisposes some people to have a hard time,” he says. Quitting smoking can be emotionally charged, he says. Symptoms typically include irritability, anger, and sad mood. “Some people are able to rally more and some may not bounce back as well because they have a harder time finding alternative sources of pleasure,” he says.

Agreeing with Niaura, Seidman says that some smokers seem to need nicotine replacement for longer periods of time. “When they come off nicotine patches or gum, it doesn’t feel right and it may be related to this subtype,” he says. “This is not a problem because nicotine replacement doesn’t cause cancer or go into yourlungs.”

People with this particular genetic variation may benefit from extended treatment, he says. “They may have a certain kind of sensitivity to nicotine, which could explain why they became addicted in the first place and why they may need to use nicotine replacement for a longer time than others.”

 

© 2011 WebMD, LLC.

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