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Archive for July 18th, 2011

Sorry about the last week

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

I am sorry I haven’t been around the last week to post some things of interest, and I have a backlog of information I need to research and post.

I have to say I’m doing rather well at the moment, though busier than normal. I do work at Wal-Mart now and should be starting on the register Wednesday morning. I miss being a cashier, or working, period. I didn’t realized how much so until I started working.

I hope I can keep this job because I need the money and have to be able to pay my bills. Not to mention I haven’t worked in 10 years and I need to prove to myself I can do this. It’s just a hard road and I’m trying to re-balance everything so I can still do things I want to do along with the things I now have to do. I will be posting more, I promise.

I will definitely be doing some more work on Tuesday. This is going to be interesting, being that my boyfriend is coming in for a visit this week and possibly my brother for a night or part of a day. Anyways, keep reading because I will always post something, even if I take a break now and then.

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Posted in Personal | Comments Off on Sorry about the last week

CBS News – Casey Anthony released from jail

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Casey Anthony walks to an SUV with her lawyer, Jose Baez, after she was released from the Orange County Jail in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday, July 17, 2011. (AP Photo)

(CBS/AP)Updated July 17 1:00 a.m. ET

 

ORLANDO, Florida (AP) — Casey Anthony was freed from a Florida jail early Sunday, 12 days after she was acquitted of murder in the death of her 2-year-old daughter Caylee in a verdict that drew furious responses and even threats from people across the U.S. who had followed the case with rapt attention.

 

Anthony, wearing a pink T-shirt with blue jeans, left the jail at 12:14 a.m. local time with her attorney, Jose Baez. She was given $537.68 in cash from her jail account and escorted outside by two sheriff’s deputies armed with semi-automatic rifles. Neither Anthony nor Baez said anything to reporters and others gathered outside.

 

She then climbed into an SUV with her attorney and sped off, destination unknown. News helicopters trailed them for a while.

 

Anthony, 25, had been finishing her four-year sentence for telling investigators several lies, including that Caylee was kidnapped by a nonexistent nanny. With credit for the nearly three years she’s spent in jail since August 2008 and good behavior, she had only days remaining when she was sentenced July 7.

 

“This release had an unusual amount of security so, therefore, in that sense, it would not be a normal release,” said Orange County Jail spokesman Allen Moore. “We have made every effort to not provide any special treatment for her. She’s been treated like every other inmate.

 

Moore said there were no known threats received at the jail. Officials had a number of contingency plans in place, including plans in case shots were fired as she was released.

 

 

Orange County Jail officials had planned to release Anthony sometime Sunday under circumstances they refused to disclose. Experts had said she would be released in the dead of night, and her defense team did their best to keep her away from the glare of the media spotlight.

 

However, more than a dozen television trucks already were outside the jail by noon Saturday, though the facility was otherwise quiet. Scores of reporters and cameramen surrounded the outside later on in the day, along with a few scattered protesters.

 

Crimesider’s complete coverage of Casey Anthony
How Casey Anthony’s release is likely to unfold
Casey Anthony to appeal verdict on lying charges
Video: Casey Anthony look-a-like feared for life

 

One of her attorneys, Cheney Mason, said Friday that Anthony was scared to leave jail, given numerous threats on her life and the scorn of a large segment of the public that believes she had something to do with the death of her daughter, Caylee.

 

Anthony was acquitted of first-degree murder in Caylee’s death earlier this month. She was found guilty of four counts of lying to police, but with time served and good behavior credits, she didn’t have to serve out her four-year sentence.

 

Another attorney, Charles Greene, said Friday that Anthony was “emotionally unstable” and needed “a little breathing room” after the draining two-month trial.

 

That could be difficult, given the vitriol directed at Anthony. After the verdict, anger spilled onto social networks like Facebook and Twitter from people who had spent weeks watching the trial on local and cable television channels. On Friday, Anthony’s legal team said it had received an emailed death threat with a manipulated photo showing the 25-year-old woman with a bullet hole in her forehead. It has been forwarded to authorities. Officials had said earlier this week that they had not received any credible threats, but they did not return a phone call about that email.

 

In Orlando and elsewhere, many remain convinced Anthony isn’t totally innocent. David Waechter recorded the trial and watched it at home with his wife every day after work. He said Anthony was guilty of “something, for sure.”

 

“I’m perplexed. You know there is something there, but you don’t know what,” he said. “Yet she is getting out.”

 

Others who have witnessed Anthony’s saga with front-row seats said they were ready for the media attention to die down.

 

“Most people I talk to, they’re done with it,” Mandy Williams, a 38-year-old county parks employee, said outside a busy grocery story. “When it came out she was not guilty, people were ticked off.”

 

Steven Klosterman, who owns a property management company, said if Anthony were to stay in Orlando, “I think she’ll wind up like her daughter,” given the threats she has received.

 

“Good luck to her,” said Klosterman, 43. “She’s going to have a hard time.”

 

Above: Aisha Howard, 10 (left); Jordan Howard, 8 (center); and their mother Susan Hoch, all of Clearwater, Fla., protest the release of Casey Anthony outside the Booking and Release Center of the Orange County Jail in Orlando, Fla., Saturday, July 16, 2011. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

 

Security experts have said Anthony will need to hole up inside a safe house protected by bodyguards, perhaps for weeks, in case someone tries to make good on one of those threats. Ideally, several SUVs with tinted windows will pull up to the jail to whisk her away, probably in the middle of the night, the experts said. Jail officials have not disclosed when she will be released.

 

Exactly where she will go also remains unclear. It’s unlikely she’ll return to the home she once shared with her parents, as the trial left her family fractured. Defense attorney Jose Baez argued during the trial that Caylee accidentally drowned in the family pool and that Casey Anthony’s father, George, covered it up to make it look like a homicide. Baez also argued that George Anthony molested his daughter when she was a child — which resulted in psychological issues that caused her to lie and act without apparent remorse after Caylee went missing.

 

“Most of the time you can always go home, but she doesn’t have that option,” said Daniel Meachum, an Atlanta lawyer who has represented football star Michael Vick and actor Wesley Snipes. “Baez has to have somewhere for her to go for her to get herself together.”

 

Casey Anthony was convicted of telling detectives several lies in July 2008, when Caylee’s disappearance was reported. She said that Caylee had been kidnapped by a nonexistent nanny, among other things.

 

Caylee’s skeleton was found that December in some woods near the Anthony family home.

 

While defense attorneys argued that Caylee’s death was an accident, prosecutors alleged that Anthony suffocated her daughter with duct tape because motherhood interfered with her lust for a carefree life of partying with friends and spending time with her boyfriend. Jurors have told various media outlets that prosecutors didn’t prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt as required for a conviction — although most have added that they don’t think Anthony is innocent.

 

Copyright ©2011 CBS Interactive Inc

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Washington Post – Casey Anthony released from jail: Is she in danger?

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Posted at 12:06 PM ET, 07/18/2011

By Sarah Anne Hughes


Casey Anthony walks to a SUV with her lawyer Jose Baez after her release from the Orange County Jail in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday. (JOHN RAOUX/ASSOCIATED PRESS)Casey Anthony left a Florida jail Sunday evening after being acquitted of charges that she murdered her daughter, Caylee, and serving a shortened sentence for lying to police.

One of Anthony’s attorneys, Cheney Mason, told the “Today” show Monday that Anthony is “safe,” but would not release details about her whereabouts.

Several outlets, including “Today,” have reported that Anthony may have boarded a private jet to Columbus, Ohio. But a flight manifest hasn’t been released and this information has not been confirmed.

MediaTakeOut.com has purportedly located Anthony in Columbus. Editor Fred Mwangaguhunga said in an e-mail to The Washington Post that the site was prepared to report her address, but the decision was made not to release the “exact address” after they were made aware that it would put her “in immediate danger.”

On Facebook, there are several Facebook groups with a variation of the title, “Kill Casey Anthony.” A member of one of the larger groups posted this message: “Ladies and Gentlemen, Casey Anthony is now OUT OF JAIL. Here’s what I have to say to that: “What we wish would happen is for a hard target search of every gas station, residence, warehouse, farmhouse, henhouse, outhouse, and dog house in EVERY area, EVERY state, city, and town and country. Your killer’s NAME — is MS. Casey Anthony …. she’s out …. let the countdown begin!”

There’s also a closed group called “Casey Anthony Hunters.”

A Pennsylvania man named Casey Anthony said he had been harassed because of his name and George Anthony told BlogPost he had received death threats.

As for Anthony herself, it is not clear when and if the 25-year-old will ever speak publicly about the case. Several book publishers have expressed interest in the story, according to USA Today.

By Sarah Anne Hughes  |  12:06 PM ET, 07/18/2011

 

© 2011 The Washington Post

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Reuters – Casey Anthony’s attorneys mum on her whereabouts

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Main Image

By Barbara Liston

ORLANDO, Fla | Mon Jul 18, 2011 1:09pm EDT

(Reuters) – An attorney for Casey Anthony would not confirm on Monday whether his client boarded a plane after her swift weekend exit from jail but said “elaborate plans” were required to keep her safe.

Anthony’s whereabouts have been a closely guarded secret since her release early Sunday after nearly three years in custody on charges connected to the 2008 death of her 2-year-old daughter Caylee.

A Florida jury acquitted Anthony, 25, on July 5 of killing Caylee but convicted her of lying to detectives during the search for the then-missing child. Caylee’s remains were found in December 2008 in woods near the Anthony family home.

Casey Anthony left the Orlando jail just after midnight on Sunday, escorted by attorney Jose Baez and guards wearing bullet-proof vests and carrying rifles.

She stepped into a waiting SUV and quickly eluded the helicopters, media and angry public gathered to witness her anticipated departure.

Her attorneys have been mum about where Anthony went.

“I will not confirm if she boarded a plane or flew on her own,” defense attorney Cheney Mason told NBC’s Today show on Monday.

“She’s gone, she’s safe and elaborate plans had to be made to keep the people away from her.”

Mason said life will be difficult for Anthony “as long as there are so many people of the lynch mob mentality and those willing to deny the fact that the jury found her not guilty (of murder).”

He said Anthony continues to deal with the loss of her child and must adjust psychologically to her newfound freedom.

“In Miss Anthony’s case, it’s going to be even more of an adjustment because she is coming out vilified virtually universally, not just in the Central Florida area but across the country, if not the world,” Anthony’s civil lawyer Charles Greene told the Central Florida News 13 channel.

Greene represents Anthony, who left jail with the $537.68 remaining in her inmate account, in several lawsuits.

A non-profit group seeks to recoup more than $100,000 spent on the search for Caylee, and a Florida woman has accused Anthony of defaming her by claiming a nanny of the same name kidnapped the toddler.

On Friday, a man named David Badali sued Anthony to recover the expenses he incurred as a diver who participated in the search for Caylee.

Attorneys for Anthony and her parents did not return calls from Reuters on Monday morning.

(Additional reporting by Colleen Jenkins; Editing by Jerry Norton)

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WebMD – FDA Warning – FDA: Repairing Pelvic Organ Prolapse With Mesh Risky

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Risks Include Pain, Infection, Need for Additional Surgery
By Denise Mann
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Surgical clamps in tray

July 13, 2011 — The risks of placing mesh through the vagina to repair pelvic organ prolapse may outweigh its benefits, according to the FDA.

Risks include mesh protruding out of the vaginal tissue (erosion),pain, infection, bleeding, pain during sexual intercourse, organ perforation from tools used in the mesh placement, and urinary problems.  Additional surgeries and/or hospitalization may be needed to treat the complications or remove the mesh.

During pelvic organ prolapse, the internal structures that support the pelvic organs such as the bladder, uterus, and bowel drop from their normal position and “prolapse” into the vagina. Pelvic organ prolapse surgery can also be performed through the abdomen or vagina with stitches or surgical mesh to reinforce the repair and correct the anatomy. Surgical mesh is also widely used in hernia repairs and to treat stress incontinence.

In 2010, there were at least 100,000 pelvic organ prolapse repairs that used surgical mesh, and about 75,000 of these were transvaginal. These are the only procedures that the new FDA mesh warning applies to.

The FDA first issued a safety communication in 2008 after they received reports of adverse events associated with the transvaginal placement of mesh. Since then, the number of adverse events has increased, although they don’t always differentiate between transvaginal and abdominal procedures. The group also reviewed the literature on the use of mesh for this procedure.

Now, the FDA will convene an outside panel of experts in obstetrics and gynecology to meet in September 2011 and discuss the safety and effectiveness of surgical mesh used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence.

FDA: Risks Outweigh Benefits

“We do not see conclusive evidence that using mesh for the transvaginal approach to pelvic organ prolapse improves clinical outcomes anymore than transvaginal procedures that do not use mesh,” says William Maisel, MD, the deputy center director for science at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health in Silver Spring, Md. “These devices appear to expose patients to greater risks.”

“Mesh is a permanent implant, and complete removal may not be possible and may not result in complete resolution of complications,” he says.

“This is not an indictment of surgical mesh,” he says. “We are talking about a very specific use of surgical mesh.”

There may still be a role for mesh in certain transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse procedures, he says.

“Some clinicians believe that the use of mesh for transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse is appropriate and is the best treatment option for selective patients such as those with severe pelvic organ prolapse,” he says.

Women who have had surgery for pelvic organ prolapse need to understand whether or not their procedure involved mesh. “For someone considering having a procedure for pelvic organ prolapse, speak with a doctor and understand if the surgery is going to use mesh, and ask about the benefits and why the decision was made,” he says.

Many Support FDA Action

Elizabeth A. Poynor, MD, a pelvic surgeon at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, has never used mesh for transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse and likely never will.

“I don’t use mesh in my practice because I have seen a significant number of complications from other surgeons, and have seen how mesh erosion can be devastating for patients,” she says.

As to why use of mesh implants for this surgery took off in the first place, she says it may have a lot to do with the complexity of the procedure.

“This is one of the most detailed and complicated surgeries that we do and unless it is done correctly, it can have a significant chance of failing,” she says. Some surgeons believe the mesh boosts the chances of a successful surgery.

“There has been the general feeling that repairs are better and sounder if mesh is used, but mesh may not be better than the proper surgical correction,” she says.

“Women who are considering prolapse surgery should review the risks, benefits, and alternatives with their surgeon to make sure that it is the right choice,” Poynor says.

“This has been a long time coming,” says J. Eric Jelovsek, MD, a staff physician in the Obstetrics, Gynecology, & Women’s Health Institute of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.

Mesh placed transvaginally for pelvic organ prolapse does have some anatomical benefit, but that is it, he says. “Quality of life is no different if mesh is placed or not, and women have a higher risk of complications,” he says.

“This doesn’t mean that you should never have mesh placed transvaginally. It means you have to have an in-depth discussion with your surgeon of the options,” he says.

For women who have had the procedure with mesh, “if you are feeling fine and doing well, there is no reason to come in and get this checked out, but if you have question or concerns, then come in,” he says.

Most of the complications will occur in the year or two after the surgery, but others such as vaginal bleeding, pain with sex, and severe pelvic pain may develop later on.

Robert F. Porges, MD, MPH, director of the division of pelvic reconstructive surgery and urogynecology and a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City, seldomly uses mesh during transvaginal pelvic organ prolapse repair.

But, he says, “in some severe cases where the muscles of the pelvic floor have been severely damaged or failed to develop, replacing the muscle with mesh may play a role,” he says. “Most women deserve an attempt to repair the prolapse using their native tissues and unless it is a failure or a repeat failure, using the mesh may not be as valuable as made out to be,” he says.

In a written statement, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists applauded the FDA’s efforts. “The College supports FDA’s upcoming initiative to convene an advisory committee, the Obstetrics Gynecology Devices Panel, to discuss the safety and effectiveness of [mesh] and notes with appreciation FDA’s willingness to reconsider how it clears mesh products for marketing.”

© 2011 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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WebMD – Extreme Fitness: Calorie-Torching Workouts

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Please remember to consult your physician before beginning any new exercise activities. Depending on your health, some of these exercises may be too strenuous for your personal situation. Swimming exercises are really good for low-impact, calorie burning exercises for people with more limited abilities, aged, or with certain limitations or physical disabilities. Whether or not you will be able to perform some of these exercises will depend on your individual situation. Please take care when getting into any new exercise regime.

 

Don’t plan on reading a magazine while you do these workouts. You’re entering a no-slacking zone.
By Annabelle Robertson
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Looking to blast calories? Get ready — it’s going to be intense.

“It’s got to be high intensity, whatever the workout is, if you’re going to torch calories — not just burn them,” says Bret Emery, a behavioral psychologist and weight loss specialist based in Weston, Fla. “Heart rate is key. That’s the speedometer of the body. If we speed the body up, it will burn more calories, just as a car will burn more fuel if it speeds up.”

Also, you need to mix up your workouts so they stay challenging. This will help keep your heart rate up, and force your body to burn more calories, Weston says.

The following workouts will zap calories, but they’ll also push your body way past your comfort zone. So check with your doctor before taking on the challenge. Don’t just tell your doctor you want to work out — let him or her know exactly what you’re planning to do. That way, your doctor can make sure you’re ready.

If you’re not active now, remember that it is better to ease into exercise in order to help prevent injury. Even though you may want to go all-out immediately, it’s wiser not to.

Interval Workout

Interval training is all about challenge and recovery — over and over — for a cardio blast.

You can do intervals many different ways — running, on any sort of cardio equipment, or in a pool.

This particular workout — which comes from Michael Banks, certified personal trainer and owner of Body by Banks Corporation in Salt Lake City — uses a treadmill. If you’re already fit, you can add dumbbells for an extra challenge.

1. Warm Up: On the treadmill, with the incline set at a challenging angle, power walk at a speed of 3-3.5 for 7 minutes. Keep your elbows up above your heart. Stop, get off the treadmill, and stretch.

2. Sprint: Drop the incline to 0, increase the treadmill speed, and sprint hard for 30 seconds. Aim for 90% of your maximum heart rate. To recover, bring your speed down to 3.0 and walk for one minute.

3. Squats: Get off the treadmill and squat, with your bottom out to the rear and your legs slightly apart. Then jump from the squatting position into the air, landing in the same squat position as before. Do this for one set of 15 or 20, working your quadriceps. If you’re already in good shape, hold dumbbells by your sides.

4. Overhead Presses: Do 15 or 20 overhead presses with the weights, pushing them straight up and directly over your shoulders.

5. Sprint: Get back on the treadmill and sprint for 30 seconds (no incline). The goal is to be at 80% of your maximum heart rate. To recover, decrease your speed to 3.0 and walk for one minute.

6. Tricep Extensions: Using dumbbells, do one set of 15 or 20 overhead tricep extensions. Your elbows should point toward the ceiling, with the weights behind your head. Lift the weights directly above your head and back down again.

7. Pushups. Do one set of 15 push-ups, with your elbows at a 90-degree angle from the body. Modification: Do the push-ups with your knees on the ground, but do 25 instead of 15.

8. Sprint: Back to the treadmill. Sprint for 1 minute, aiming for 70% of your maximum heart rate. To recover, jog for 90 seconds.

9. Jumping Jacks. Do one set of 15 or 20 jumping jacks. If you’re strong enough, add two 10- or 15-pound dumbbells — lift up the weights when you jump out, in an overhead press position, pulling them back down to shoulderheight as your legs go back together.

10. Finale: Incline your treadmill to an angle that really challenges you — but don’t hang onto the treadmill’s rails. Walk at a 2.0-3.5 speed for 30 seconds, aiming for 60% of your maximum heart rate. To recover, bring the treadmill down to a 1.0 incline and drop your speed to 1.9 or 2.0 for a 1-minute walk. Finish by stretching.

Quick CrossFit Series

CrossFit workouts are about getting maximum effort in minimum time.

The following exercises come from Doug Katona, co-founder and owner of CrossFit Endurance in Newport Beach, Calif. They can be done on their own, all together, or in any combination.

30-90s

  1. Warm up for 10-12 minutes, finishing the warm-up at 75% of your maximum heart rate or at 7.5 on the perceived exertion scale, in which 0 is no effort and 10 is your max.
  2. Choose any type of cardio. Do it at your maximum effort for 30 seconds.
  3. Stop and recover for 2 minutes, or for 90 seconds if you’re already in good condition. Do not shortchange the rest period.
  4. Do this up to three times.

Body Weight Blast

As fast as you can, do 10 squats, 10 push-ups, and 10 full sit-ups. Then do nine reps of each. Then eight, seven, six, and so forth, until you reach one rep of each exercise. Rest as little as possible between sets. Record your time and try to improve each week.

100 Burpees

If you only have a little time, try to do 100 burpees. Or, if that’s too much, start with 25, then move to 50, then to 75, until you can do 100.

Begin in a squat position with your hands on the floor, in front.

  • Kick back your feet to a push-up position.
  • Return your feet to the squat position.
  • Jump from the squat position into the air, straight above you.
  • Repeat, moving as fast as possible

Rowing or Indoor Cycling

Don’t overlook the rowing machine and stationary bikes in your gym. You may be sitting down, but you’ll be sweating when you try this workout from Scott Nohejl, coach and program director of The Chatham Area Rowing Association in Savannah, Ga.

  1. Row or bike for a minute.
  2. Sprawl with push-up. Run in place, with your feet just coming off the ground, for a count of five. Lower yourself onto your hands, jump your legs backward to a push-up position. Do one push-up, then bring the legs back, tucking them in. Stand and repeat for 1 minute.
  3. Squats. With hands on top of your head, squat so your knees are at 90 degrees — make sure they do not go past your toes — and then stand up. Repeat for 1 minute.
  4. Side jumps. With feet together, toes pointed forward, jump from side to side for 1 minute.
  5. Rest for 5 minutes.
  6. Row or bike for 1 minute.
  7. Scissor jumps. With one leg in front and the other in back, jump and “scissor” your legs before landing. Do this for 1 minute.
  8. Sumo jumps. Squat down, then jump, bringing your feet slightly off the ground. Do this for 1 minute.
  9. Jumping jacks. Do these for 1 minute.

Repeat the full set four times, nonstop, for a 16-minute workout. Cool down, and then stretch.

Swimming

The pool isn’t just for cooling off. It’s also a great way to heat up your metabolism — and burn a maximum number of calories.

Craig Keller, chair of the U.S. MastersSwimming Coaches Committee and head coach of the Asphalt Green Masters Swim Team in New York City, offers several workouts for swimmers, including two that will work well for people with injuries.

If you like distance, begin with two 500-yard (or meter) freestyle swims on intervals of 6.5 minutes. The quicker you finish, the more time you’ll have to rest. Then swim at an easy pace for two minutes.

Follow that with two 400-yard freestyle swims on a 5.5-minute interval, and another easy, two-minute swim. Finish with two 300-yard swims on 4.5-minute intervals.

Sprinters may prefer this workout:

  1. Do 20 freestyle lengths (25 yards) with five seconds of rest in between lengths. Recover with a 100-yard swim of your choice, at an easy pace.
  2. Do 16 25-yard swims of your choice with 10 seconds of rest, followed by another slow-paced 100-yard swim of your choice.
  3. Next, do 12 25-yard freestyle lengths with 15 seconds of rest between each. Recover with a 100-yard swim.
  4. End with 8 25-yard Freestyle lengths, resting for 20 seconds between lengths.

Got a leg or hip injury? Just grab a buoy and do a “pull swim” instead.

This workout consists of three rounds of four 200-yard freestyle swims. For the first, put the buoy between your ankles and pull the four 200-yard swims on 3-minute intervals. For the second round, remove the buoy and swim, dragging your legs. Do these 200-yard swims on 2.75-minute intervals. For the final round, place the buoy between your legs and pull on 2.5-minute intervals.

If your arms or shoulders are hurting – or you simply want to work your legs – use a kickboard and do two sets of four 100-yard swims, with 20 seconds of rest between each.

For the first 100 yards, kick hard for the first 25 yards, then go easy for the remaining 75 yards. For the second 100 yards, kick hard for 50 and easy for 50. Kick hard for 75 yards, then easy for 25 on the third one. And for the last one, go all out. Repeat the set.

More Calorie Burners

There are lots of other great options for burning calories through exercise. Here are some:

  • Playing basketball
  • Running
  • Jumping rope
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Taking an aerobics class
  • Spinning (stationary bike class)
  • Dancing (the faster you dance, the more calories you’ll burn)

Exactly how many calories you burn depends on your weight – and how intensely you do the exercise.

© 2010 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

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WebMD – Pain Management Health Center

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Pain Relief Strategy: Cross Your Arms?

Study Suggests Crossing Your Arms Can Reduce Pain by Confusing the Brain’s Pain Signals
By Jennifer Warner
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Woman crossing arms

May 20, 2011 — Crossing your arms may confuse the brain and help fight pain, according to a new study.

The study suggests crossing arms at the wrists mixes up the brain’s perception of pain signals sent from the hands to the brain and reduces the intensity of pain.

Researchers say the findings may lead to new therapies to treat painful conditions by manipulating the brain’s perception of the body.

“Perhaps when we get hurt, we should not only “rub it better” but also cross our arms,” says researcher Giandomenico Iannetti, MD, of University College London, in a news release.

Conflicting Information From the Brain

In the study, published in Pain, researchers used a laser to deliver a pin-prick-like pain sensation to the hands of eight adult volunteers in two different positions. The first time, the participants had their hands at their sides and the second time they crossed their arms over the center of their bodies.

The participants then rated their perception of pain. Researchers also measured the brain’s electrical response using an electroencephalography (EEG).

The results showed that both the perception of pain and EEG activity was reduced when the arms were crossed.

Researchers say the reduction in pain is most likely due to confusion in the brain from conflicting information being sent from the brain’s internal and external maps.

“This means that the areas of the brain that contain the map of the right body and the map of right external space are usually activated together, leading to highly effective processing of sensory stimuli,” says Iannetti. “When you cross your arms these maps are not activated together anymore, leading to less effective brain processing of sensory stimuli, including pain, being perceived as weaker.”

 

© 2011 WebMD, LLC.

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WebMD – You Can Start Feeling Better: 8 Important Things to Do About Depression

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Fears and Facts About Antidepressants

WebMD Medical Reference

By Mary Anne Dunkin

Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD

Along with counseling, antidepressants are a common part of treatment for depression. And they are usually effective. Six out of 10 people treated with antidepressants feel better with the first one they try. If the first antidepressant medication doesn’t help, the second or third often will. Most people eventually find one that works for them. Yet many people who could benefit from an antidepressant never try one, often because of fears and misconceptions about them, experts say.

Here are eight common fears about antidepressants, as well as facts that can help you decide if an antidepressant might be right for you.

Fear: Antidepressants make you forget your problems rather than deal with them.

Fact: Antidepressants can’t make you forget your problems, but they may make it easier for you to deal with them. Being depressed can distort your perception of your problems and sap you of the energy to address difficult issues. Many therapists report that when their patients take antidepressants, it helps them make more progress in counseling.

Fear: Antidepressants change your personality or turn you into a zombie.

Fact: When administered correctly, antidepressants will not change your personality. They will help you feel like yourself again and return to your previous level of functioning. (If a person who isn’t depressed takes antidepressants, they do not improve that person’s mood or functioning.) Rarely, people experience apathy or loss of emotions while on certain antidepressants. When this happens, switching to a different antidepressant may help.

Fear: Taking an antidepressant will make me gain weight.

Fact: Like all drugs, antidepressants have side effects, and weight gain can be a common one of many of them. Some antidepressants may be more likely than others to cause weight gain; others may actually cause you to lose some weight. If this is a concern, talk with your doctor.

Fear: If I start taking antidepressants, I’ll have to take them for the rest of my life.

Fact: Most people who take antidepressants need to take them continuously for six to nine months – not necessarily a lifetime. Once an antidepressant gets depression under control, you should work with your doctor to decide when to stop your medication and then decrease your dose gradually. Discontinuing them suddenly may cause problems such as headaches, dizziness, and nausea.

Fear: Antidepressants will destroy my sex life.

Fact: Antidepressants can have an effect on sexual functioning. The problem is usually an inability to achieve orgasm rather than a lack of desire. But because depression itself decreases libido, a medication that eases depression may improve your sex life. As with other side effects, certain antidepressants may be more likely than others to cause sexual problems.

Fear: Antidepressants are expensive and aren’t covered by insurance.

Fact: Antidepressants are usually covered by insurance plans with prescription drug coverage. The cost of antidepressant therapy varies widely, depending on the dosage, the drug you are taking, and whether it is available as a generic. Even without insurance coverage, it is possible to purchase a generic antidepressant for as little as $15 per month.

Fear: Taking an antidepressant is a sign of weakness.

Fact: Like medical conditions such as diabetes or high cholesterol, major depression is a condition that often responds to medication.When depression interferes with your ability to function normally, seeking treatment is not a sign of weakness. It’s a sign of good self-care.

Fear: Antidepressants increase the risk of suicide.

Fact: Studies in recent years have raised concerns that antidepressants may raise the risk of suicide among children, adolescents, and young adults. For example, a 2009 review in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) analyzed 372 studies involving nearly 100,000 people who were taking antidepressants. It found that compared to placebo, use of antidepressant drugs was associated with a small increased risk for suicidal thoughts in some children and young adults, have no effect on suicide risk among those 25 to 64, and reduce risk in those 65 and older.

In 2004, the FDA required manufacturers of antidepressants to revise their labels to include a black box warning statement about these risks.

Other studies paint a different picture. A 2006 study published in PLoS Medicine suggests that the use of antidepressants has saved thousands of lives. Data show that the U.S. suicide rate held fairly steady for 15 years prior to the introduction of the widely used antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) and then dropped steadily over 14 years while sales of Prozac rose. The research team found the strongest effect among women.

The bottom line: Regardless of your age or sex, it’s important to see a doctor immediately if you have suicidal tendencies or witness them in others.

 

© 2010 WebMD, LLC.

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WebMD – Cosmetic Surgery Self-Assessment

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Most people seek cosmetic surgery to feel better about themselves. Does it work? Studies suggest that patients are generally pleased with the outcome of their cosmetic surgery and report improvement in self-esteem, social confidence, and quality of life.

However, cosmetic surgery may not be appropriate for every person or every problem. If you are considering cosmetic surgery, take some time to contemplate these questions:

1. Why am I considering cosmetic surgery?

The healthiest reason to have cosmetic surgery is to improve your self-image — the way that you feel about yourself. People who have a strong self-image are usually more confident, effective in work and social situations, and comfortable with their relationships. Cosmetic surgery is often thought of as psychological surgery. Its purpose is to enhance your feeling of well-being and to foster emotional health.

2. Am I having cosmetic surgery to please others or myself?

Make sure that you are considering cosmetic surgery for internal reasons having to do with yourself, and not external reasons. Cosmetic surgery cannot stop your boyfriend from leaving you. It cannot bring you new friends. It cannot get you a better job. You’ll likely be disappointed in the results if you are having cosmetic surgery to please someone else.

3. Are my expectations realistic?

Having realistic expectations may be the single most important factor in achieving a successful result. Cosmetic surgery can dramatically improve your appearance, but it has its limitations. It is unwise to expect that cosmetic surgery can create the face of a celebrity (with the hope of acquiring a celebrity lifestyle) or restore the lost youth of decades past.

4. Am I emotionally prepared for cosmetic surgery?

There are certain circumstances under which cosmetic surgery may be inappropriate. These include a crisis or an emotional upheaval such as divorce, death of a spouse, or loss of a job. Also, surgeons are reluctant to consider cosmetic surgery on patients who are depressed, have significant mental illness, are impossible to please, or are obsessed with perfection.

5. Is now the best time for cosmetic surgery?

Even if you are emotionally prepared for cosmetic surgery, you may want to delay it if you are under external pressure or preoccupied with other matters. Plan your surgery when you are relaxed and can afford the time to convalesce and heal afterwards. Otherwise, you may face longer and more difficult recovery periods.

6. How will I adjust to the change in my body image?

It may take some time for you to adjust to your new body image. This is especially true for procedures that create a major change to your face, such as nose surgery (rhinoplasty). Procedures such as Botox injections, which merely create a younger looking you, are easier to accept.

7. Am I prepared to handle unexpected results?

Cosmetic surgeons, like all surgeons, cannot offer you guaranteed results. Unexpected results occur rarely, but when they do occur they create emotional distress for both the patient and the surgeon. You must be prepared for the worst case scenario and realize that it will require time, patience, and a mutual trust between you and your surgeon to work toward improvement.

8. Do I have a support network?

It’s important to have someone to support you physically and emotionally during your recovery. Realize that you may have days when you feel depressed as you go through the healing period. Beware of negative comments from friends or family members who may have issues with your decision to change your appearance. Graciously decline offers of help from those who may be critical of your decision.

9. Have I considered and accepted the risks?

There is risk involved with any surgery. In addition to the general risks related to anesthesia, blood loss, and infection, specific risks for cosmetic surgery include skin loss, asymmetry, slow healing, numbness and minor dimples and puckers. You must consider and accept all of the risks for each procedure before making your decision to have cosmetic surgery.

10. Can I afford cosmetic surgery?

Cosmetic surgery is usually not covered by health insurance. You are choosing to accept the costs in exchange for surgery that will help you feel better about yourself. If you can’t afford the cost, in addition to a second procedure should one be needed, the added financial stress could actually make you feel worse about yourself.

 

© 2009 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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WebMD – Home Births on the Rise in the U.S.

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Increase in Home Births Comes as Debate Over Safety Intensifies
By Brenda Goodman
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

May 20, 2011 — The number of women in the U.S. who gave birth at home rose 20% between 2004 and 2008, a new study shows.

Although home births represent only a fraction of the millions of babies delivered in the U.S. each year, researchers say the bump is significant because it follows a steady, 15-year decline in the practice and comes at a time of intense debate over the safety of home births.

A review paper published in 2010, for example, found the risk of newborn death was two to three times higher for babies born during planned home births compared to planned hospital births.

The review generated so much criticism that the journal that published it, The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, took the unusual step of having independent experts revisit its methods and conclusions.

In the end, the journal published a fuller explanation of the findings, but the paper was not retracted.

In January, citing the evidence from the much scrutinized review, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists issued an opinion discouraging home births.

The World Health Organization, the American College of Nurse Midwives, the American Public Health Association, and the National Perinatal Association all support home and out-of-hospital births for low-risk women.

The current study will likely further fuel the discussion, since it found that home births appear to be getting safer.

From 2004 to 2008, rates of preterm births and low birth weights had dropped slightly among infants born at home, by 16% and 17% respectively.

Women Who Opt for Home Birth

The study found that college-educated white women in their 30s and 40s who have already had at least one child are the most likely to opt for home birth.

The rate of home births rose 28% among non-Hispanic white women from 2004 to 2008, a greater increase than was seen in any other racial or ethnic group. There was also a slight rise, 0.03%, among Asian mothers.

Rates of home births declined slightly among African-American women over that time period and held steady for American Indians and Hispanics.

Overall, there were 28,357 home births in the U.S. in 2008, representing 0.67% of all the babies born that year. In 2004, home births accounted for 0.56% of the total.

Why More Women Are Giving Birth at Home

Researchers who have watched the trend believe it may signal a growing desire among expectant mothers to have more control over the kinds of procedures that are used to deliver the baby, particularly cesarean sections.

“Our study is based on birth certificates, so I don’t have direct data on why, but certainly we’ve seen a lot of discussion and interest recently in the birthing process,” says study researcher Marian F. MacDorman, PhD, a statistician in reproductive health at the National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Md.

“For example, a lot of concern about the rising C-section rate, rising medical interventions, induction of labor, episiotomy, and so forth,” MacDorman tells WebMD.

“I think there’s a certain group of women who maybe feel nervous about going to the hospital and maybe having a C-section they didn’t want or something like that,” she says.

Other experts say that rings true.

“They are people who have had control over their lives, so they want control over this,” says Annette E. Fineberg, MD, an obstetrician-gynecologist in the department of women’s health at the Sutter West Medical Group, in Davis, Calif.

Feinberg recently wrote a commentary forObstetrics & Gynecology on the rise in home births, but she was not involved in the study.

She says many of her patients have voiced concerns about a hospital birth experience, hoping they’ll have a better chance of delivering a baby vaginally if they give birth at home.

Sometimes, they’re right, she says.

Home Births and C-Sections

“There is currently a cesarean epidemic in the United States,” says Aaron Caughey, MD, PhD, chair of the department of obstetrics and gynecology and director of the center for women’s health at Oregon Health and Science University, in Portland.

Caughey is researching home births but was not involved in the current study.

He points to the numbers: In 1996, 21% of births were C-sections, but by 2009, that number was 32%, a 50% increase, “making cesarean delivery the most common surgery that a woman under the age of 50 will have.”

Fear of lawsuits has driven some doctors to order C-sections instead of waiting for labor to progress.

“The saying in the profession is that ‘nobody is ever sued for the cesarean delivery they did too soon,'” Caughey says.

And many hospitals refuse to let women who’ve had one C-section deliver their next baby vaginally, even though most can do so safely, a policy that sends some women looking for other options.

At the same time, he says, it’s clear that doing more cesareans hasn’t improved the health of mothers or infants.

“There wasn’t then a dramatic decline in birth injury. It’s not like we somehow improved outcomes with that cesarean delivery,” he says.

Most mothers and infants recover well after C-sections, but the procedures require a longer healing time than vaginal deliveries, up to four to six weeks, and there are additional risks of bleeding, infection, or reactions to anesthesia.

In addition, the March of Dimes says babies born by C-section are more likely to have breathing problems than babies that are delivered vaginally. And though it’s not clear why, moms who have C-sections are less likely to breastfeed.

C-sections may also cost more than vaginal births.

Midwives See Increased Interest

The majority of babies that are born at home, about 60%, are delivered by midwives, the study found.

And midwives say they’ve noticed an increase in demand.

“We started out our practice doing eight to 12 births per month and now we’re doing twice that number,” says Alice Bailes, a certified nurse midwife who has a practice in Alexandria, Va., with Marsha Jackson, who is also a certified nurse midwife.

The women who come to them, they say, are well informed, and are looking to avoid invasive births and procedures they may not want. They also may have been born at home themselves and want to continue the tradition.

“Women are having fewer babies and they do a lot of research. The Internet is available,” Jackson says. “They do a lot of research to look at all the different options to be sure that the practitioner that they work with is going to help them have the type of birth that they desire.”

Weighing the Risks of Home Birth

Even in normal pregnancies that have progressed without a hitch, Caughey says things that happen during labor and delivery can make the birth risky to mother or baby.

“I think that the evidence would suggest that if you have a birth far away from the ability to do an emergency cesarean delivery, complications could occur that could lead to morbidity and mortality in the babies,” Caughey says.

“What is that number? It’s maybe one per thousand or two per thousand,” babies that will run into trouble, he says. “It’s not a big number. It’s not a dramatic number.”

“That needs to be played off a person’s preferences, what a person wants, and what risks they want to take.”

For healthy, normal pregnancies, Fineberg thinks home births are a reasonable option.

But she worries that some women who are opting for birth at home, particularly mothers who are over age 40, may not realize the increased risks they face.

“Statistically, they have a much higher chance of having interventions in labor, that’s been shown in quite a few studies,” she says.

From a midwife’s perspective, women with pre-existing medical conditions should probably avoid home birth.

“If you have heart conditions, high blood pressuregestational diabetesmultiple births, or breech births, those aren’t the people we feel are appropriate candidates for home birth,” Jackson says.

 

© 2011 WebMD, LLC.

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WebMD – Everyday Fitness

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

with Pamela Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP

Living life to the fullest is all about striving for a mind-body balance every day. Achieve a mental, nutritional, and physical transformation for life with tips from wellness expert Pamela Peeke, MD.

Monday, May 23, 2011

Glorious Glutes for a Sunsational Summer

Your Best Beach Body, Part Three

Welcome to Week Three of our “Back to the Beach” six week campaign. If you’ve missed the first two weeks, or need a refresher, click here. We’ve begun our Beach Mind Beach Body journey, but this time with a mental and physical twist.

Instead of obsessing about body parts, I’m asking you to engage your mind to see how your lifestyle behaviors are reflected in how you look and feel. If you do, you’ll experience a royal win win — by being more mindful of your body all day, your body will benefit by all of that attention. You’ll look great and feel so much better. This week we’ll use your beautiful behind as a case in point.

Hey, call it what you want — behind, booty, derriere — those soft pillows of feminine flesh serve you well all day. They power you out of chairs, up the stairs and straighten you up after tying your sneakers. I’ll bet you didn’t know that the gluteus maximus is the largest muscle in the body. Keep in mind, that, like all other muscles, if you don’t use it, you lose it. Simple routines that anyone can do will keep your rear end from sagging into those less than attractive rolls of bountiful butt straining your pant seams.

Many of you have a love-hate relationship with your butt. Well, that ends now. It’s time for you to express your own Glute Gratitude. Yep, let’s take what you’ve got and appreciate and optimize it.

Staying consistent with my MIND MOUTH MUSCLE template, you’re going to enter this third week with Power MIND. As I’ve noted in the previous blogs, you’ll fight any urge to default back to self-denigrating comments about your body. We’ll have none of that! Instead, this week you’ll say, “I’m smart, beautiful and fun and this week I’m going to practice body gratitude.” Every day, wake up and appreciate all of the body parts that work. Stop concentrating on what you can’t do, and pay attention to what you can do. This is especially true for as you age. Joints are creaking and there’s that recurring pain. Adapt and adjust and be happy you’re here today to rock and roll through another 24 hour life adventure.

Moving to the MOUTH, how about a few simple tricks to help you with the cravings that can destroy your best beach body intentions? Get over the urge to splurge by:

1) Medicating with Movement: Stop using food to anesthetize your stresses. Instead, get up and move. Research has shown that when that creepy craving starts to hit, you should hit the road. All it takes is 15 minutes of walking to increase levels of both the pleasure chemical dopamine as well as the mood modulator serotonin. In combination, they help you win the food fight.

2) Pound down the Protein: Got a craving? Grab lean protein all day long — for meals and snacks. Protein helps to curb the “I’m starving and I need to eat everything that’s not tacked down” hunger hormone, ghrelin. Avoid only eating protein at main meals. If you include protein in your snacks (low fat dairy, peanut butter on apple slices), you’ll keep this hunger hormone in check all through the day.

3) Substitute: Hey, it’s OK to have a treat every now and again. When you do, how about creating a tasty, healthy “cheat” by doing simple substitutions. Instead of grabbing something with boatloads of addictive refined sugar, make a fruit parfait with fresh berries and yogurt. Forget the potato chips and instead have hummus and carrots.

Now it’s time to honor that gluteal MUSCLE. I love these exercises because most are simple and easy to do throughout the day. Remember to always check with your medical team before you engage in any physical activities, especially if you have a medical and/or physical condition.

1) Stop Sitting So Much: Get up more often throughout the day. Walk while you talk on the phone. I always recommend standing and moving every 30 minutes. You’ll increase your fat burning metabolism as well as engage your muscles to keep them firm and fit.

2)  Stay Mindful of Your Rearful: As many times as you can, become mentally aware of your behind and as you do, contract your glutes. You can be standing in line, walking up stairs or running to the bus. Pay attention to how they feel as you move. As I noted in a previous blog, engaging your core throughout the day keeps your posture upright and makes you appear taller and slimmer. The same is true for the glutes. Become glute aware!

3) Burn Your Butt Fat: As you proceed to do some of the glute exercises, just remember that in addition to strength training and good nutrition, you absolutely need to be doing regular cardio (goal is to burn 400 calories each session) with intensity intervals. That means when you hit the hills by increasing your treadmill’s incline, you’ll cook a ton of calories compared to simply walking on the flat. Crank up your treadmill’s incline to 5%, walking at a pace of around 3.5-4MPH and you’ll burn at least 350 calories per hour, which is a 64% increase over walking on a flat surface. Or ramp up the speed with which you walk. Intensity intervals simply mean adding hills and/or speed every now and again to your workout. Check out the WebMD resources on how to do interval training.

4) Butt Blasters:

  • Backward Leg Toe Touch and Lift: Stand behind a chair, toes facing forward, with both hands placed on top of the chair for stability. Keeping both knees straight, extend your left leg back pointing your toes with your big toe is touching the ground behind you. Gently lift your left leg about 30 degrees off the ground without bending your knee. Tighten your glutes and hold for a count of 10. Bring down and touch the ground with your pointed big toe and lift right back up for another count of 10. Repeat this 5 times and switch sides.
  • Donkey Kick Crossover: Grab a mat and get on all fours with your hands under your shoulders. Keep your left knee and ankle flexed as you lift your knee to hip level behind you. Hold for a count of 5 and bring down, touching the mat briefly and lift again. Repeat 5 times and switch sides.
  • Butt Bridge: Lie face up on a mat with knees bent and feet flat, arms by your side. Left hips slowly off the floor, forming a straight line from knees to shoulders. Tighten your glutes and maintain this bridge position for a count of 10. Bring your butt down for 10 seconds and lift back up again into bridge position for a count of 10. See if you can do it for a count of 20. Repeat 5 times.
  • Sizzling Squat: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Engage your core abdominal muscles. Place your hands behind your head, elbows out to the side. Squat down, never going beyond a 90 degree angle to your lower legs. For novices or anyone with knee issues, just squat down enough to feel your glutes engage well and hold for a count of 3. As you stand up, for an added twist, rotate your trunk to the left and lift your bent left knee in front of you. Return to squat again. Switch sides and repeat. Do this whole set 5 times.
  • Invisible Chair Wall Squat: You can do this anytime and anywhere there’s a wall. Standing straight, place your back on a wall. Squat down as previously described, and imagine you’re sitting on an invisible chair. Squeeze your glutes. Hold for a count of 5-10 (or 20 for the advanced), and stand up. Rest for 10 seconds and repeat 5 times.

Everything I’ve described is simple and doable. So, do it already! Summer’s around the corner. That’s your “bottom” line! Next week, we’ll move upstairs anatomically to help you with your right to bare strong and fit arms for a sensational season. Keep it going everyone!

Read the Series:

© 2011 WebMD, LLC.

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WebMD – Raising Healthy Kids – Ways to Keep Kids at a Healthy Weight

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed By David Ludwig, MD, PhD

If your child is at a healthy weight now, you may wonder what you can do to help him maintain it.

If your child is currently overweight, you may wonder how you can help her stick to a serious diet and exercise plan.

Well, according to experts, rigorous diets and exercise plans are not the healthy habits to be striving for. Singling out an overweight kid will just make him feel persecuted and unhappy. It also won’t work.

Instead, you can help your overweight kid move toward a healthy weight in much the same way you can help a healthy weight kid maintain that healthy weight. How? By making it easy for everyone in your family to make healthy choices and encouraging them to make those choices so consistently that they become your family’s healthy habits.

Making healthy choices can help an overweight kid who is still growing hold his weight steady so he can grow into his weight as he gets taller. Small healthy choices also give healthy weight kids the habits and foundation to maintain their weight.

Healthy Habit 1: Choose to eat dinner as a family.

You can encourage family health by having the whole family sit down to dinner together as often as possible.

It might seem like an indirect way to help with your child’s weight, but experts say it can help. Studies have found that family meals are associated with a healthier diet and lower rates of obesity.

Why? Experts say that social eating is good for us. Family dinners are a healthy habit that help us stay emotionally connected.

Plus, when kids eat on their own — especially plopped down in front of the TV — they might not pay attention to their hunger and absentmindedly overeat.

Finally, when you cook at home, you control the menu, so it’s easier for everyone to eat healthy.

Healthy Habit 2: Don’t let your child set the menu.

It’s potentially a disservice to your family’s health to let a child’s limited tastes dictate the family’s diet. If you do, you might wind up eating hot dogs and mac and cheese every night.

When you’re cooking healthy meals — filled with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean meats, and dairy — your child might not like the vegetables that show up on her plate. But keep offering them anyway. Studies show that the more kids are exposed to a food, the more likely they are to try it.

When you’re making a healthy entrée that your child might not like, experts recommend that you include a healthy food that she does like — fruit, for instance — as a side dish. That way, there’s something familiar for her.

If she protests, experts suggest that you be firm: Make it clear that her choices are limited to what you’ve served. Resist the temptation to cave in and make her a separate meal. In time, she’ll come to accept the limits that you’re setting — and will start trying some healthier foods.

Healthy Habit 3: Choose to reduce TV time.

Because many studies have found a clear association between television-watching and obesity, experts say that reducing your kids’ TV time makes sense. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no more than 1 to 2 hours of TV watching a day for kids aged 2 and older. It’s best if children younger than 2 not watch TV at all.

Of course, the most effective way to curb your child’s TV watching is for you to also limit your time in front of it. The easiest way to successfully have a healthy family is for you to lead by example.

Afraid such healthy goals will challenge your poise and patience? If you’re swooping in every 15 minutes, scowling, and clicking off the TV, you might face a revolt — or your kids will just scurry off to a different screen — a computer, video game, or TV in another room.

To keep your cool and remember your goal to have a healthy family, don’t focus on what your kids can’t do, but what they can do. For instance, don’t even mention after-school TV. Instead, create a list of activities — rain or shine — that can be done after school instead of TV watching, like dancing to favorite songs or biking in the neighborhood. Then, help your child pick 1 to try.

Healthy Habit 4: Buy a pedometer for everyone in the family.

It’s not enough for you to demand that your child exercise. Instead, inspire your whole family to move more.

Outfitting each family member with a pedometer encourages healthy habits. Once a kid starts to track how many steps he’s taking, it’s pretty natural to want to take more. At the end of the day, everyone can compare the number of steps they took and chart their progress. It can become a fun competition that leads to better family health. Studies have found that pedometers can be effective in kids as young as 6.

How many steps should your child be taking? While many adults aim for 10,000 steps per day, researchers say that a child’s target should actually be higher. One study found that for kids aged 6 to 12, a healthy goal for girls was 12,000 steps a day and 15,000 steps a day for boys.

That might seem like a lot, but kids are naturally more active than adults. Of course, a child’s stride is much shorter, so they won’t walk as far as you will.

Start slowly. Begin by aiming for an additional 2,000 steps to what each person takes on an average day now. Even that modest increase will help with family health.

Healthy Habit 5: Choose not to micromanage your child’s eating.

As a parent, you don’t want to be watching every bite of food that goes into your kid’s mouth. You don’t want to be swatting her hand away from the cookie jar all the time. That sort of micromanaging will just make everyone miserable.

Instead, the easiest path to raising a healthy family is to remove the source of conflict. Replace the cookie jar with a fruit bowl. After all, kids do most of their eating at home — that’s true even for many teens. Because parents are the ones who shop, you have control over the food that’s in the house.

When you’re at the grocery store, swap the chips and cookies you normally put in your cart with healthier options. Don’t buy sugary drinks like soda and juice-like drinks, and limit the amount of 100% fruit juice you buy.

Buy only foods that you want your child to eat. It will boost your family’s health, and you won’t worry so much about which food she’s choosing for a snack.

Healthy Habit 6: Choose healthy ways to manage stress.

Some studies have shown that kids with stressed-out moms are more likely to be overweight. The cause of the stress can be anything from health problems in the family, money issues, or problems with their mate.

So, here’s another reason to enlist help to find solutions to your stressors — to help your kid’s weight stay in a healthy range. Try these healthy stress relievers:

  • Talk it out with a friend, counselor, or religious advisor.
  • Use exercise as a way to burn off stress.
  • Tell your kids about your stress, using words they can understand.
  • Look for support to help you with the things causing you distress from family, government programs, hospital classes, and so forth.

By handling stress in healthy ways you set a great example for your kids, too.

Healthy Habit 7: Choose to make sleep more important.

Studies have found that a lack of sleep is associated with weight gain. When kids are overtired, changes to hormones and metabolism seem to increase the risk of obesity.

To raise healthy kids, enforce a routine bedtime. You can make the transition easier by trying to make the time before bed relaxing. A helpful way to do this is to remove distractions from your child’s bedroom — including TVs, cell phones, and computers.

Sticking with the same routine even on the weekends can help eliminate fluctuations in mood from fatigue and avoid that Monday-morning angst from trying to get back on schedule.

Bedtime may get harder with teens. As kids hit adolescence, their body clocks reset, and they become biologically wired to stay up late. Because high school starts so early, many teens are chronically overtired and at higher risk of obesity as a result.

As a parent, the best you can do is to work with your teen to encourage healthy sleep habits before bed. Help them see just how much better they feel when they do get enough sleep and how much easier it is to concentrate in school.

A healthy amount of sleep helps reduce the risk of obesity in adults too. So prioritize sleep accordingly to set a healthy example for your family.

Healthy Habit 8: Choose to be consistent about family health.

Consult with an expert — like a dietitian or childhood weight loss expert — to adopt basic, sensible changes to your family’s diet and exercise routine and stick with them.

If after a few months you don’t think these healthy habits are helping — if, for instance, your child has been gaining weight — check in again with an expert and tweak your family’s plan.

The most important thing to help your family adopt healthy habits is to stick to your plan. Stay consistent: about the foods you have in the house, about family exercise routines, and about bedtime.

If you do, your kids are more likely to accept your rules in the long run. If they sense any hesitation on your part, they’re more likely to argue and push back. With persistence, you will be able to help your kids adopt healthy habits, and they will benefit for the rest of their lives.

 

© 2011 WebMD, LLC.

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WebMD – Chefs’ Diet Secrets

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

How top chefs manage their weight.
By Lisa Zamosky
WebMD Feature

If you think managing your weight is tough, imagine if your job was to spend all day cooking, thinking about, and tasting food. That’s the challenge professional chefs face each day when they go off to work. In spite of being around tantalizing food all the time, however, many professional cooks manage to keep themselves in great shape. How do they do it?

WebMD talked with three working chefs to learn about their weight management strategies, and with one nutritionist to determine if these methods make sense for those of us cooking at home.

Managing Hunger

How is it possible to eat all the time and still be hungry? Most chefs say they taste small amounts of food all day long but rarely sit down to a full meal.

Chef Dale Talde, director of Asian concepts for the Starr Restaurant Group, which is based in New York and owns many restaurants on the East Coast, says it’s a requirement of his job to taste every dish that leaves the kitchen to make sure it’s up to standards. Talde, who has been featured on the Bravo’s Channel’s Top Chefs and Top Chef All-Stars, figures that amounts to eating thousands of calories each day.

“But you never eat a full meal,” he says. “You’re not hungry but you’re not totally satisfied either.”

Talde works nights and says he’s lucky to get home before midnight. By then he’s ready to eat. “It’s that sense of a hard day’s work finished off by a meal,” he says.

Over the past two years, Talde has packed on about 30 pounds. His blood pressure has risen, too. This has caused him to get creative in finding ways to reduce his caloric and salt intake, but still perform his duties as a chef.

One of his biggest tricks is making sure he doesn’t let himself get too hungry.

“I don’t [usually] like to eat before noon, but now I wake up earlier to get something healthy in – some cottage cheese with salsa and arugula, for example – that way I have something in my stomach before I go to work. It’s easier to maintain what you’re eating when you’re not starving,” Talde says.

The Nutritionist’s Take: Talde’s approach is smart, says Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, assistant director of UCLA’s Center for Human Nutrition.

“The night is over and it’s not even a question that they’re famished at 11 p.m. or midnight,” Bowerman says of chefs working the dinner rush. “It’s how they unwind at the end of the day.”

For chefs and home cooks alike, scheduling time for a good breakfast — with some protein (such as a protein shake or some protein-rich cottage cheese) and healthy carbohydrates such as fruit — helps keep hunger at bay, making us less likely to overeat. The key is to fuel up adequately and make sure you’re getting nutrients earlier in the day.

Limiting Alcohol

Drinking fine wines and liquors often goes with the territory of being a chef. “It’s often 2:00 in the morning when we get out of work, so there’s not much else to do but go to the bars,” Talde says.

For many chefs, fine wine – and plenty of it – is the natural accompaniment to a good meal. But alcohol adds a lot of calories to your day. Half a bottle of wine, for example, is approximately 250 calories, Bowerman says. Drinking also loosens one’s resolve to eat well.

Talde says he recently began alternating a glass of wine with a glass of sparkling water at dinner to cut back on the calories. He also found that drinking water from a wine glass made the experience feel more special. “Then I really don’t notice and it doesn’t feel like I’m missing out on anything,” Talde says.

The Nutritionist’s Take: “Alternating an alcoholic beverage with a calorie-free beverage is a tip I always make for people,” Bowerman says. And putting the nonalcoholic drink in a wine glass is a great psychological trick that for some can make sparkling water just as satisfying as drinking wine. “The wine glass idea makes sense,” Bowerman says. “It may be something just about feeling the stem of the glass that elevates the meal to something more special.”

If drinking only half the alcohol you normally would with each meal seems unsatisfying, take a different approach. Bowerman suggests adding up the total number of drinks you have in a week and then cutting it by a third. “Can you cut out one night, rather than cutting back every single day?” she asks. For some people, that approach is more successful.

Keep It in the Bowl

Chef Nikki Cascone was a contestant on the Bravo Channel’s fourth season of Top Cheftestant and owns Octavia’s Porch, a restaurant in New York. She’s among the lucky few with a naturally fast metabolism that has kept her slim for most of her life. But after having a baby four months ago, managing her weight has become a new challenge.

Like Talde, Cascone finds that the chef’s lifestyle makes it difficult to eat well. “You’re never really off when you get to a certain level, especially when you own a restaurant. There are late-night hours and it’s a very tense environment. You’re dealing with the public, high stress, and high temperatures. I’ve had to train myself to eat healthy,” she says.

One trick that’s worked well for Cascone is keeping all her meals confined to one bowl, and consciously filling the bowl with lean protein, such as chicken, legumes, seeds, and vegetables. Packing it full of healthy foods helps her to feel satisfied. Limiting the meal to one bowl helps her to not overeat.

The Nutritionist’s Take: “She’s practicing portion control,” Bowerman says of Cascone. The size of the container we eat from can determine how much we eat, according to Bowerman, and for the average dieter at home, that’s a great tip.

But if you don’t care for the idea of eating every meal from a bowl, control your portions instead by using a smaller plate. “It’s about the visual impact of looking at a full plate of food,” Bowerman says.

Swap Ingredients

Diane Henderiks, RD, is a personal chef and culinary nutritionist who frequently appears on Good Morning America. Her goal is to raise the culinary bar for healthy cooking. “I switch up ingredients to maintain the integrity of the dish without fat and sodium,” she says.

Henderiks’ motto is that any dish can be made healthier. She cooks with fresh and dried herbs, citrus juices, and nectars to make dressings that are lower in fat and sugar. Ground turkey substitutes for ground beef, applesauce or yogurt are used in place of butter, broth or wine instead of oil, and she uses marinades and rubs to add flavor to meat without adding calories.

Similarly, Cascone uses a balsamic vinegar reduction (balsamic vinegar cooked on the stove top until it’s reduced to a syrup) for a very low-calorie salad dressing, and has replaced all table sugar with agave syrup as a way of eliminating refined sugars from her diet.

The Nutritionist’s Take: For the home chef, these are great techniques and they all add up, Bowerman says. “Cutting fat and calories becomes habit.”

Just be careful when replacing sugar with natural sweeteners like agave syrup, because “you’re not saving any calories,” Bowerman says. Still, she concedes it could be a small change that works for some people because the taste of agave syrup is more complex than table sugar, and it often blends better in things like ice tea. “Sometimes these replacements, although not saving calories, are more satisfying, and so people use less of it.”

Focus on Grains

Cascone says when she’s building her bowl of food she grants more space to grains than to protein. “I’m big on grains like quinoa. That’s a priority over fish or meat,” Cascone says.

The Nutritionist’s Take: Whole grains (as opposed to refined grains) are a very important part of our diet, Bowerman says, and few of us get enough of things like barley, brown rice, buckwheat, oatmeal, popcorn, or wild rice.

Still, she says, protein is the most satisfying type of food when it comes to keeping hunger in check. Whole grains are high in fiber and filling but can be high in calories too, so it’s important to watch portion size carefully. “When I have people look at a plate of food, one-third should be filled with lean protein. The rest of the plate should be vegetables and salads,” Bowerman says.

 

©2005-2011 WebMD, LLC.

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WebMD – Top 8 Acne Treatment Mistakes

Posted by 4love2love on July 18, 2011

Common ways people go wrong in treating their acne.
By Anna Nguyen
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

For the nearly 50 million Americans affected by acne, the many available medications and treatments can be confusing and overwhelming.

It’s easy to make mistakes treating acne or even make it worse, despite the best intentions.

Recommended Related to Acne

Skin Conditions and Acne

Most people develop acne — the most common skin condition — to some degree, but it primarily affects teenagers undergoing hormonal changes. Acne may be mild (few, occasional pimples), moderate (inflammatory papules), or severe (nodules and cysts). Treatment depends on the severity of the condition.

Read the Skin Conditions and Acne article > >

Here, experts list the most common mistakes people make while treating acne. In most cases, a dermatologist can help undo the damage.

Mistake No. 1: Not trying an acne treatment long enough

Skin reacts slowly to treatment. Even if the acne came on fast, it still requires time to heal. That usually takes between two to six weeks, says Barbara R. Reed, MD, a dermatology professor at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver.

April W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, assistant professor of dermatology at the University of California Davis Health System, tells WebMD that she advises patients to give a product one month and keep using it if they notice any improvement.

In some cases, the skin can experience minor irritation the first couple of weeks of treatment, says Diane S. Berson, MD, FAAD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Ithaca.

“It’s not an infection, it’s an inflammation. It can even get worse before it gets better,” Berson says.

Mistake No. 2: Trying too many products at once

People usually layer on products when they don’t get results in the first few days of treatment, Reed tells WebMD.

“What then happens is that they start trying different products, abandoning them very quickly if they do not see results in a day or two. They also add one product to another. Sometimes the products can cause irritation of the skin and add further insult to the owner,” Reed says.

When someone self treats their acne, they may accidentally traumatize their skin. This can make the acne lesions bigger, more likely to pigment, and heal with spots and scars, Berson says.

Mistake No. 3: Overscrubbing or overcleansing the skin

Scrubbing the skin will actually worsen acne, as it can compromise the skin’s protective barrier and can increase irritation, Berson says.

Instead, gently wash with a nonirritating, pH-balanced cleanser to decrease inflammation. It’s also important to thoroughly rinse off the cleanser because the residue can be irritating, she says.

“Acne is not from dirt,” Reed says. “Many people tend to overwash and overscrub when they get acne. As one of my teachers used to say, ‘If acne were from dirt, you would have it on your feet!’

Mistake No. 4: Choosing the wrong products for acne-prone skin

Harsh cleansers, alkaline bar soaps, and alcohol-based products may worsen acne, says Berson, who has consulted for skin care product makers Galderma Stiefel, Proctor & Gamble, and Neutrogena.

Reed says she advises patients to look for “noncomedogenic” or “for acne-prone skin” products. Noncomedogenic products do not contain ingredients that tend to clog pores in people with acne-prone skin.

Certain ingredients found in products such as cosmetics, sunscreen, and moisturizers are more likely to clog pores. They include isopropyl palmitate, isopropyl myristate, butyl stearate, isopropyl isostearate, decyl oleate, isostearyl neopentanoate, isocetyl stearate, myristle myristate, cocoa butter, acetylated lanolin, and D & C red dyes. Products containing oil can clog pores and lead to breakouts.

 

Mistake No. 5: Popping and picking at pimples

Popping and picking pimples prolongs healing time and increases the risk of scarring. Infected material can get pushed further into the skin, leading to more swelling and redness.

“People tend to groom the lesions. They examine them very closely several times a day and start imagining that there is something they can stick in the lesion or extract from the lesion. So they pick and the lesion gets worse,” Reed says.

Mistake No. 6: Waiting too long to see a dermatologist

It’s time to make an appointment once acne starts taking a toll on self-esteem, becomes painful, causes excessive scarring, or if over-the-counter (OTC) medications aren’t clearing it up.

Dermatologists have more tools to treat acne, and can prescribe stronger doses of OTC medications and oral antibiotics. They also offer new technologies, such as light and laser therapy, and chemical peels. However, newer does not necessarily mean better, and these treatments are probably not necessary to treat a patient’s acne, Armstong says.

Dermatologists can give prescription medicines that are tailored to the type of acne a person has and also their skin type, Reed says.

It’s also possible a patient could have rosacea, which usually requires different treatment than acne. Rosacea is a long-term disease that causes redness and pimples.

Mistake No. 7: Overusing or under using a prescribed acne medication

Berson says she stresses to patients to use the medication as instructed. Overusage will not help clear the acne, but can cause additional redness and dryness.

Not sticking to a regimen delays any potential improvements.

Half of the battle is consistency. Many people under use because they lose motivation after the first two weeks. They can’t expect results overnight, Armstrong says.

Underusing the medication by spot-treating fails to prevent breakouts.

“You need to apply medication to the entire affected area that tends to break out, instead of spot treating. With spot treating, you haven’t addressed the area next to it, where another pimple could be brewing, Berson says.

Mistake No. 8: Stopping the use of acne medication once it clears up

It is best to taper medication usage by using it less and less. For example, if you’ve been using it twice a day, use it once a day for awhile, then once every other day, then twice a week, and then stop. It often takes acne four to six weeks to return, just like it took it the same amount of time for it to get better, Reed says.

To keep skin blemish-free, most people need to continue usage with at least one acne product. It’s possible to cut down to a few times a week if someone is using an OTC medication.

 

© 2011 WebMD, LLC.

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