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Archive for June 29th, 2011

Leslie Nielsen dies 84

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Leslie William Nielsen, OC (February 11, 1926 -November 28, 2010) was a Canadian actor and comedian. Although his acting career crosses a variety of genres in both television and films, Nielsen achieved his greatest successes in the comedy films Airplane! and The Naked Gun. His portrayal of serious characters seemingly oblivious to (and complicit in) their absurd surroundings gives him a reputation as a comedian.

Nielsen’s lead roles in the films Forbidden Planet and The Poseidon Adventure came long before he considered a turn to comedy. His deadpan delivery as a doctor in 1980’s Airplane! marked a turning point in Nielsen’s career, one that would make him, in the words of film critic Roger Ebert, “the Olivier of spoofs.” Nielsen appeared in over 100 films and 1,500 television programs over the span of his career, portraying over 220 characters.

Death of Leslie Nielsen
In November 2010, Nielsen was admitted to a Fort Lauderdale, Florida hospital for pneumonia. On November 28, Nielsen’s nephew announced to the CJOB radio station that Nielsen had died in his sleep around 5:30 p.m. EST, surrounded by family and friends. His nephew reflected on Nielsen’s life, “He was truly a nice man. A very caring, naturally funny guy in day-to-day life, not just because someone wrote something on paper for him. He was a very tender-hearted man. He was one of my best friends and I loved him dearly. I’ll miss him greatly.”

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Geraldine Doyle, WWII Poster ‘We Can Do It!’ Inspiration, Dies 86

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Geraldine Hoff Doyle (July 31, 1924 — December 26, 2010) was the real-life model for the World War II era We Can Do It posters, an embodiment of the iconic World War II character Rosie the Riveter.

Because the We Can Do It poster was created for an internal Westinghouse project, it did not become widely known until the 1980s, when it began to be used by advocates of women’s equality in the workplace.

In 1942 Geraldine found work as a metal presser in a Michigan factory. (As men started enlisting and being drafted into military service for World War II, women began to support the war effort by taking on roles, including factory work, that were formerly considered “male only.”)

Because she was a cello player, Geraldine feared a hand injury from the metal pressing machines and soon left the factory. During the brief time she worked there a wire photographer took a picture of her. That image – re-imagined by graphic artist J. Howard Miller while working for the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating Committee — became the basis for the poster Miller created during a Westinghouse anti-absenteeism and anti-strike campaign.

Doyle didn’t know she was the model for We Can Do It until 1984, when she came across the original photograph in a 1940’s back issue of Modern Maturity Magazine.

Death of Geraldine Doyle
Geraldine Doyle died in Lansing, Michigan, due to complications from arthritis.
Geraldine Hoff Doyle was 86 years old at the time of her death.

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Peggy Rea, Actress (Dukes of Hazzard, I Love Lucy,etc.. ), Dies 89

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Peggy Rea (March 31, 1921 – February 5, 2011) was an American character actress known for her many roles in television, often playing matronly characters. Her recurring roles included:

  • Cousin Bertha on All in the Family
  • Martha Burkhorn on All in the Family
  • Rose Burton on The Waltons
  • Lulu Hogg on The Dukes of Hazzard
  • Ivy Baker on Step by Step
  • Jean Kelly on Grace Under Fire

Rea appeared in such television programs as I Love Lucy, Bonanza, Gunsmoke, Sergeant Bilko, Ironside, Burke’s Law, Marcus Welby, M.D., Hunter, The Odd Couple, Gidget, MacGyver, and The Golden Girls. She also appeared in feature films, including Cold Turkey and In Country.

Death of Peggy Rea
Peggy Rea died of congestive heart failure at her home in Toluca Lake, Calif.,
Peggy Rea was 89 years old at the time of her death

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Elizabeth Taylor, Screen Legend, Dies 79

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

 

Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, DBE (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), also known as Liz Taylor, was an English-American actress. A former child star, she grew to be known for her acting talent and beauty, as well as her Hollywood lifestyle, including many marriages. Taylor was considered one of the great actresses of Hollywood’s golden age. The American Film Institute named Taylor seventh on its Female Legends list.

Elizabeth Taylor Cause of Death
Elizabeth Taylor dealt with various health problems over the years. In 2004 it was announced that she was suffering from congestive heart failure, and in 2009 she underwent cardiac surgery to replace a leaky valve. In February 2011 new symptoms related to congestive heart failure caused her to be admitted into Cedars-Sinai Medical Center for treatment.

Elizabeth Taylor died on 23 March 2011 surrounded by her four children at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California
Elizabeth Taylor was 79 years old at the time of her death.

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Mel McDaniel, Grand Ole Opry Country musician, dies 68

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Mel McDaniel (September 6, 1942 – March 31, 2011) was an American country music artist. His chartmaking years were the 1980s and his hits from that era include “Louisiana Saturday Night,” “Stand Up,” “Anger and Tears,” the Number One “Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On”, “I Call It Love”, “Stand On It” and a remake of Chuck Berry’s “Let It Roll (Let It Rock).”

His career finally took off with “Louisiana Saturday Night” in 1981, a number one hit “Baby’s Got Her Blue Jeans On” in 1984 and Top 10 hits, like “Right in the Palm of Your Hand” (later covered by Alan Jackson in 1999), “Take Me to the Country,” “Big Ole Brew,” and “I Call It Love.”

McDaniel was a member of the Grand Ole Opry (since 1986) and made frequent appearances on the show.

McDaniel was inducted into the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame in 2006, along with induction classmate Leon Russell.

Mel McDaniel’s Health and Cause of Death
Since 1996, he had been recovering from a near-fatal fall into an orchestra pit, suffered while he was performing at a show in Lafayette, Louisiana. On June 16, 2009, McDaniel suffered a heart attack, putting him in a medically induced coma in a Nashville area hospital according to The Tennessean. Mel’s wife, Peggy, requested the prayers of the singer’s fans, saying his situation was “not good.” McDaniel died March 31, 2011 as a result of cancer.

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Yvette Vickers, Pin-up Model’s Mummified Body found

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Yvette Vickers (August 26, 1928 – death discovered April 27, 2011, in Beverly Hills, California) was a blond-haired, blue-eyed American actress, pin-up model and singer.

In 1959, she appeared as the Playboy Playmate of the Month for the July issue. Her centerfold was photographed by Russ Meyer. She also appeared in several other men’s magazines.

Her neighbor became concerned after noticing a large pile of yellowing mail in her mailbox as well as spider webs across her front door. Her mummified body was found inside her home on April 27, 2011. It was unclear when she died, but may have been months (up to almost a year).

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‘Macho Man’ Randy Savage, WWF Wrester, Died 58

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Randall Mario Poffo (November 15, 1952 – May 20, 2011), better known by his ring name “Macho Man” Randy Savage, was an American professional wrestler and actor best known for his time with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) and World Championship Wrestling (WCW). He also had a short run with Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA). Savage held twenty championships during his professional wrestling career and is a seven-time world champion: a two-time WWF Champion, four-time WCW World Heavyweight Champion, and one-time USWA Unified World Heavyweight Champion. Also a one-time WWF Intercontinental Champion, WWE has named Savage the greatest Intercontinental champion of all time and credited him for bringing “a higher level of credibility to the title through his amazing in-ring performances.” Aside from championships, Savage is the 1987 WWF King of the Ring and the 1995 WCW World War 3 winner. For much of his tenures in the WWF and WCW, he was managed by his real life wife, “Miss Elizabeth” Hulette.

Miss Elizabeth died May 1, 2003, at the age of 42

Randy Savage Cause of Death
Randy Savage suffered a heart attack around 10AM while driving on a highway in Tampa, Florida before losing control of the vehicle and crashing.  Randy Savage was driving a 2009 Jeep Wrangler when he “veered across a concrete median … through oncoming traffic … and “collided head-on with a tree.” His wife Lynn was a passenger but survived with “minor injuries”. According to officials, both were wearing their seat belts at the time.
Randy Savage was 58 years old at the time of his death

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Joseph Brooks, “You Light Up My Life” Songwriter, Dies Before Trial 73

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Important Background Story:
Joseph Brooks was waiting for a trial on charges of sexually assaulting of more than a dozen women.  He allegedly lured the women to his apartment to audition for movie roles.  He was indicted on June 23, 2009. He was being tried by Manhattan’s state Supreme Court for 91 counts and charged with rape, sexual abuse, criminal sexual act, assault, and other charges.

A month ago, Joseph Brooks’ son was accused of murdering a swimsuit designer.

  

Joseph Brooks (March 11, 1938 – May 22, 2011) was an American screenwriter, director, producer, and composer. He composed the hit song “You Light Up My Life” for the film of the same name that he also wrote, directed, and produced.

In the 1960s Brooks was a composer of advertising jingles, including highly successful ones for Pepsi, “You’ve Got a Lot to Live”, and Maxwell House, “Good to the Last Drop Feeling”.

In October 1977 “You Light Up My Life” reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 popularity charts where it held the top position for 10 consecutive weeks, which was then the longest run at #1 in the chart’s history. With sales of over four million copies in the United States alone, the song ultimately became the biggest hit of the 1970s. It also hit #1 Adult Contemporary and was even a Top 10 “Country” single. The passionate ballad also earned Brooks a Grammy Award for Song of the Year as well as an Academy Award for Best Original Song, a Golden Globe Award and an American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Award. The song was Debby Boone’s first solo hit record and only Top 40 Pop hit.

Joseph Brooks Cuase of Death
Police reported on May 22, 2011, that Brooks was found dead by a friend of an apparent suicide. He was 73 years old. His body was found in his Upper East Side apartment with a plastic dry cleaning bag around his head and a towel around his neck. His body was near a helium tank with a hose on it and a suicide note.

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‘Grease’ actor Jeff Conaway has died

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Jeffrey Charles William Michael Conaway (October 5, 1950 – May 27, 2011, known by his stage name, Jeff Conaway, was an American actor, best known for his roles in the movie Grease, and the US TV series Taxi and Babylon 5. He also directed the 1992 film Bikini Summer 2.

Jeff Conaway Cause of Death
On May 11, 2011, Conaway was found unconscious from what was initially described as an overdose of what was believed to be pain medication, and was taken to a hospital in Encino, California, where he was listed as being in critical condition and in a coma.  After the initial reports, Dr. Drew Pinsky, who had treated Conaway for substance abuse, said the actor was suffering not from a drug overdose but rather from “pneumonia with sepsis”, for which he was placed into an induced coma.

While pneumonia was the cause of death, the doctor who treated him for drug addiction for years says it was his dependence on prescription painkillers that eventually cost him his life.

“Jeff was a severe, severe opiate addict with chronic pain, one of the most serious and dangerous combination of problems you could possibly interact with,” Dr. Drew Pinsky said during a taping for Friday night’s “Dr. Drew” on HLN.

Jeff Conaway died on May 27, 2011, after 2 weeks in a comma.
Jeff Conaway was 60 years old at the time of his death.

Conaway appeared on VH1’s ‘Celebrity Fit Club’ in 2008 and later on ‘Celebrity Rehab,’ where he admitted to being addicted to cocaine, painkillers and alcohol.

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Clarice Taylor Dies at 93; TV’s Cosby Called her Mom

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

By 
Published: June 2, 2011

Clarice Taylor, an actress who was best known as the endearing, self-possessed grandmother on“The Cosby Show” and who also won an Obie Award for her Off Broadway portrayal of the vaudeville comedienne Moms Mabley, died on Monday at her home in Englewood, N.J. She was 93.

NBC, via Associated Press

Clarice Taylor as Anna Huxtable with Bill Cosby as Cliff Huxtable, her son, in 1992 in a scene from “The Cosby Show.”

Blog

The cause was congestive heart failure, her spokesman, Ulysses Carter, said.

In a recurring role, Ms. Taylor played Anna Huxtable, Dr. Heathcliff Huxtable’s mother, during the nine-year run of the program starting in 1984. Both she and Earle Hyman, who played Dr. Huxtable’s father, Russell, received Emmy nominations in 1986.

“Clarice was a hip mother, fearless,” Bill Cosby said in a statement, adding that she was “perfect” in the role even though “she looked young enough to play my sister.”

When she tried out for the part, Ms. Taylor told The Associated Press in 1987: “I put on a gray wig, a bandana over that, flat-heeled shoes and a long dress with no shape to it. Bill saw through my act. I read five lines, and he said, ‘If you’re going to go through all of this, you’ve got the part.’  ”

Ms. Taylor played another grandmother on television, Harriet, on “Sesame Street,” a farm woman who sometimes visited her grandson, David, in the city. That recurring role, starting in the 1960s, was a big break in her career. It led, in 1971, to her casting as Birdie, the housekeeper who is almost killed in Clint Eastwood’s thriller “Play Misty for Me.” Ms. Taylor’s stage credits include the hit musical “The Wiz,” in which she played Addaperle, the Good Witch of the North.

As a teenager growing up in Harlem, Ms. Taylor sometimes skipped school to see Moms Mabley perform at the Apollo Theater. In the mid-1980s, Ms. Taylor decided to put together a show that paid tribute to a woman renowned for racy sexual humor that relied on innuendo rather than obscenity. The show, “Moms,” written by Alice Childress, wove comedy with the poignant memories of Jackie Mabley, a great-granddaughter of a slave, who was raped twice as a young girl, the second time by the white sheriff of her North Carolina town. Clarice Taylor was born in Buckingham County, Va., on Sept. 20, 1917, to Leon and Shirley Taylor. The family moved to Harlem in the 1920s.

Ms. Taylor is survived by two sons, William and James, and five grandchildren.

She began her acting career with the American Negro Theater in Harlem. In 1967 she was a founding member of the Negro Ensemble Company, based in the East Village.

“I certainly know about the oppression and prejudices of being black and a woman and from the South,” Ms. Taylor told The New York Times in 1987.

“I was told I would have to survive in an oppressed land,” she continued. “My family thought it was insanity for me to go into the theater rather than to get an education.”

© 2011 The New York Times

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Low-Carb Snacks – Buffalo chicken bites

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 25 minutes (includes baking time)

Buffalo chicken bites
Cooking spray
1 pound cooked chicken breasts, cut into bite-size chunks
1/2 cup red hot sauce (such as Frank’s Red Hot Sauce)
3 tablespoons melted, reduced-calorie margarine
2 teaspoons dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
Celery sticks
Reduced-fat ranch or blue cheese salad dressing (I prefer no salad dressing or an oil-based dressing)Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat a baking dish with cooking spray, and place chicken bites in the baking dish. In a bowl, combine Red Hot sauce, margarine, parsley, and garlic powder. Pour evenly over chicken. (If you wish, you can refrigerate the combined chicken and sauce until you are ready to heat and serve.) Bake for 20 minutes. Put a toothpick in each piece of chicken and place on serving tray. Serve with celery sticks and salad dressing.

Yield: 42 pieces
Serving size: 7 pieces

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 154
Carbohydrate: 1 g
Protein: 24 g
Fat: 6 g
Saturated fat: 1 g
Sodium: 209 mg
Fiber: <1 g

Exchanges per serving: 3 lean meat
Carbohydrate choices: 0


This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky.

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The Dreaded Weight Plateau: Tips to Get Over It

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

June 20, 2011

Amy Campbell

Last week we examined the typical reasons for those dreaded but all too real weight-loss plateaus (when you stop losing weight despite eating right and exercising regularly). They’re frustrating and discouraging, but they’re common (so at least you’re not alone!).

Luckily, if you’re in the midst of a plateau or if you ever have been stuck in one, chin up. There ARE things you can do to break that barrier and reach your weight goal. However, a word of caution: There’s no magic bullet for busting those plateaus, just as there’s no magic bullet for losing weight. You may need to try different approaches until you find what works…for you!

Nine Tips for Taking on (and Tripping up) the Plateau

1. Blast up your BMR… with food. Remember that BMR (basal metabolic rate) that we discussed last week? This is the rate at which your body burns calories to perform basic functions like breathing. You need to do everything in your power to give it a boost because it’s very likely turned a little sluggish at this point. A slowdown in your BMR happens because you’ve lost weight, particularly muscle weight. Here’s one way to jump-start it: make sure you’re eating enough (yes, that’s right!). If you’ve whittled your calorie intake down too much (less than 1600 calories for men, less than 1200 calories for women), you’ve probably gone too far. Your body has entered starvation mode, which means that it’s slowed everything down in an effort to preserve and conserve. Break the cycle and rev up your engines to get back on the calorie-burning bandwagon by eating more. If you need help, meet with a dietitian.

2. Dig out your pen and paper. Remember those days when your dietitian asked you to keep food records? If you’ve blocked that out of your memory, think about revisiting record keeping. Food record keeping can seem like a painful chore, but this process really does serve a purpose: By writing down everything that you eat and drink (and you need to be honest about it), you really can get a good picture of where things may have gone awry. Because let’s face it, sometimes weight loss slows down due to those sneaky little calories that seem to pile up when you’re not looking. Or, it may be that you let your emotions get the best of you and you deal with them by eating. You can uncover these things by keeping records, even for just a few days each week. (By the way, successful “losers” who are part of the National Weight Control Registry use record keeping as one of their tools for keeping the weight off.).

3. Figure out your food. By this, I mean, take a good hard look at what you’ve been eating. Food records will help you do this. Even if you refuse to keep records, it pays to focus on your food choices. Have you become too lenient with what you’re eating? In other words, are fatty or empty-calorie foods making their way back into your eating plan? They’re sneaky like that. What about your portions? When was the last time you actually weighed and measured your food? Are you SURE you’re only eating one cup of pasta? Dust off your meal plan or, if you don’t have one, get thyself to a dietitian, or consider joining a commercial weight-management program (such as Weight Watchers) or an online program to get back on the straight and narrow.

4. Ditch the dining out. You don’t have to forgo eating out altogether, but if you routinely eat lunch and dinner out, you’re pretty much guaranteed to consume far more calories than you realize…or need. Treat yourself to a meal out once a week and keep it at that.

5. Add resistance. In addition to scrutinizing your food intake, you have to take a hard look at your activity. Hitting the gym or walking is great, but your body needs to be pushed beyond its comfort zone. This doesn’t mean becoming a marathon runner, but if you’re doing the same old exercise routine day in and day out, you need to kick it up a notch. Particularly, you need to add strength training to your routine. This means using weights or resistance bands, or even using your own body weight as resistance. Remember that muscle burns calories, so you need to focus on building up your muscle mass.

6. Just do it…in intervals, that is. Interval training means changing up the intensity of your workout, not necessarily adding more time to your workout. To learn more about how to do this, speak with an exercise physiologist or a trainer at your local gym or Y. Read more about it here.

7. Drink water. There is some evidence that drinking water, especially cold water, can speed up your metabolism. And some people find that drinking water helps them curb their appetite.

8. De-stress. Some experts believe that constant stress affects metabolism by triggering the release of cortisol, a hormone that can lead to weight gain, among other things. Stress can also affect your food choices and interfere with being active. Deal with stress head-on by taking up yoga, practicing meditation or relaxation, or, if you need help, meeting with a mental health specialist.

9. Take a break. A prominent physician in the field of weight loss with whom I used to work always told his patients: “You first need to stop gaining weight before you can lose weight.” He also believed that it’s OK to maintain for a while. In other words, take a break, if you need it. Recharge and remotivate.

 

Re-posted from Amy Cambell’s blog

 

Copyright © 2011 R.A. Rapaport Publishing, Inc.

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Artichoke heart and salmon salad

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 25 minutes
Cooking time: 5 minutes (to blanch artichoke hearts)

4 fresh artichoke hearts, blanched and chopped (canned can be substituted)
Lemon half
1 can (12 ounces) water-packed, skinless, boneless salmon, drained well
1/2 cup frozen green peas, thawed and drained
2 celery ribs, chopped
1 tablespoon chopped celery leaves
4–6 green onions, chopped
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/4 cup reduced-calorie red wine vinaigrette salad dressing
4 radicchio leaves

To prepare the artichokes, trim stem and remove the thorny tops of the outer leaves with scissors or by bending the leaves. Cut off the top inch of the thin, inner leaves with a knife. Pull out the pink inner leaves by hand and remove the choke (bristle-like hairs) with a small scoop or knife. As you work, rub all cut surfaces with lemon to keep from browning. Submerge artichokes in water with some lemon juice added until ready to cook.

 

Bring 1 1/2 quarts of water to a boil in a saucepan, add artichokes, and cook for about 3–5 minutes until softened; let cool. When cooled, remove remaining leaves from hearts and cut hearts into quarters or chop coarsely.

In a medium bowl, combine salmon, artichoke hearts, peas, celery, celery leaves, green onions, lemon peel, and dressing. On each serving plate, place one leaf of radicchio. Scoop a quarter of the salad onto the leaf and serve.

Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: about 1 1/4

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 204
Carbohydrate: 13 g
Protein: 20 g
Fat: 8 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 49 mg
Sodium: 745 mg
Fiber: 5 g

Exchanges per serving: 3 lean meat, 1 starch
Carbohydrate choices: 1


This recipe was developed by Kathleen Stanley, the Diabetes Education Program Coordinator at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. She frequently performs cooking demonstrations and has been involved in diabetes education for over 18 years.

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Skillet chicken piccata

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 5 minutes 

Cooking time: 20 minutes

4 four-ounce boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 cup plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
Nonstick cooking spray
Black pepper
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon light margarine
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1 cup fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup thawed and drained frozen green peas
1/4 cup chopped green onion

Using a meat mallet, pound chicken breasts to uniform thickness. Spread 1 cup flour on a dinner plate or shallow dish and dredge chicken pieces in flour. Spray a large skillet with nonstick cooking spray and heat to medium-high. Brown floured chicken pieces on both sides (about 2–3 minutes per side), then remove from skillet to a clean plate. Sprinkle chicken with black pepper. Lower heat under skillet to medium, and add olive oil, margarine, and garlic to skillet. When margarine has melted, sprinkle 1 tablespoon flour over mixture and stir into a roux (pastelike mixture). Slowly add chicken broth to skillet, stirring constantly with a whisk or spoon. Continue stirring until sauce thickens, then mix in lemon juice. Return chicken to skillet, spooning some of the sauce over the chicken. Cover skillet and cook an additional 7–10 minutes over medium heat until sauce bubbles and chicken is cooked through. Add peas and green onion to pan and cook 2 minutes more, then serve.

Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 breast

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 191
Carbohydrate: 3 g
Protein: 29 g
Fat: 7 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 78 g
Sodium: 692 mg
Fiber: 1 g

Exchanges per serving: 4 lean meat
Carbohydrate choices: 0


This recipe was developed by Kathleen Stanley, a Diabetes Educator at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky.

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Chicken gumbo

Posted by 4love2love on June 29, 2011

Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 45–55 minutes

Cooking spray
3/4 pound fresh okra or frozen, thawed okra, cut in 1/2-inch slices
1 tablespoon corn oil
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 can (14 1/2 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes, drained
1 medium onion, chopped
1 teaspoon (or 1 clove) minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each) 50%-reduced-sodium, fat-free chicken broth
1 cup water
1 pound cooked, diced, chicken breast (for convenience, thaw fully-cooked, frozen, diced chicken, such as Tyson)
3 2/3 cups cooked hot brown rice

Coat a nonstick skillet with cooking spray, warm over medium heat, add okra, and cook until slightly softened, about 6–8 minutes. Remove okra to a plate and set aside. Add oil to the skillet and warm over medium-high heat. Gradually add flour, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low and continue cooking and stirring until the flour-oil mixture turns golden brown, about 3–5 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high then stir in tomatoes, onion, garlic, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and salt. Cook until onion becomes translucent, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile combine broth and water in a stockpot, cover, and warm over medium heat. Stir tomato mixture into hot broth, mixing well. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low and stir in okra and chicken. Cover and simmer 30–40 minutes. Serve 1 cup gumbo over 1/3 cup cooked rice.

Yield: 11 servings
Serving size: 1 cup gumbo over 1/3 cup rice

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:
Calories: 163
Carbohydrate: 22 g
Protein: 12 g
Fat: 3 g
Saturated fat: <1 g
Cholesterol: 22 mg
Sodium: 391 mg
Fiber: 3 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 1 nonstarchy vegetable, 1 lean meat
Carbohydrate choices: 1 1/2


Tami Ross is a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky.

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